Tech Company Stratasys Launches 3D Capsule Collection

·2 min read

MILAN — Israel-based Stratasys, a leader in polymer-based 3D printing solutions, has launched its first 3D fashion collection, created with the Stratasys J850TM TechStyleTM 3D printer and based on 3DFashionTM technology and in collaboration with Italian manufacturing technology industry, Dyloan.

The collection, named SSY2 2Y22 Reflection Collection, is especially timely after the past two years of the pandemic, showing how technology and fashion can cooperate to create increasingly sustainable and efficient production solutions.

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“We want to maximize the capacity of technology in order to revolutionize the market and make fashion and production more accessible and sustainable,” said Stratasys’ creative director Naomi Kaempfer at a presentation staged in Milan during Design Week. “In addition to collaborating with renowned fashion designers, this year we also wanted to focus on how the pandemic has impacted us, by analyzing themes such as identity, gender fluidity, race and sustainability.” Indeed, the goal of the capsule collection is to create garments and accessories that last over time and that can be worn in all seasons and will therefore reduce waste.

Stratasys SSY2 2Y22 Reflection Collection includes collaborations with Karim Rashid, Jasna Rok Lab, Ganit Goldstein, Foræva founded by Lana Dumitru and Vlad Tenu, Assa Ashuach, Illusory Material by Jiani Zeng and Honghao Deng and fashion brand Kaimin.

Rashid created four dresses using 3D printed directly onto the fabric to reproduce a tromp l’oeil motif; Rok Lab presented four different styles of garments, each inspired by an emotion: sadness, anger, fear and happiness, reflected by the color of the garment and the positioning of the 3D print. Ashuach conceived an origami bag and shoe incorporating AI technology to collect data. The shoe is being showcased at Dubai’s Museum of the Future for the first time.

Red dress design by Jasna Rokegem and Travis Fitch. - Credit: Image courtesy
Red dress design by Jasna Rokegem and Travis Fitch. - Credit: Image courtesy

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Kaempfer, who has worked with 3D printing since 2003, believes that this new way of producing clothing could be incredibly beneficial for fashion companies. “We are working with the high-end fashion market, which will be our very first real step in bringing this technology to brands.” She said the advantages “are the acceleration of the production process: thanks to this technology we are able to send the file of the garments we want to produce with the sizes and colors everywhere in the world in a matter of minutes. This way, brands will be able to completely cut shipment costs.”

Sustainability will also be one of the core values if brands will decide to adopt 3D printing as the garments will be made-to-order avoiding overstock, she concluded.

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