wrinkles

  • 26-year-old with 'Wrinkles' Challenges Beauty Stereotypes by Becoming a Model

    Sara Geurts is only 26-years-old, but suffers from Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome — a rare genetic disorder that affects the body’s production of collagen and can cause skin to be stretchy, saggy, and fragile.

  • No One Can Believe the Age of This Woman

    A photo of a 63-year-old grandmother is going viral for her youthful appearance. On Sunday, a man named Chavo Lotti tweeted a photo of the woman, writing, “My grandma turned 63 yesterday,” and the Internet went nuts over the woman’s wrinkle-free visage and dewy glow, not to mention her oversized topknot and colorful overalls.

  • This Calculator Analyzes if Your Lips Are Aging You

    People tend to think about the eyes first when it comes to your physical appearance revealing your age. While it’s true that this is one of the most recognized areas of the face to show the signs of aging (we’re talking to you, crow’s feet), your lips could be giving your age away. As funny as that seems, there is now actually a lip age calculator that virtually detects how old your lips appear.

  • Iconic Supermodel Linda Evangelista Admits the Unthinkable: ‘I Like Wrinkles’

    Linda Evangelista, one of the original iconic supermodels, isn't afraid of aging. She likes wrinkles and just wants to look good.

  • Science Says Smiling Makes You Look Older

    According to a new study published in the journal “Psychonomic Bulletin & Review,” people who smile are perceived as two years older than their actual age.

  • Hair Loss, Warts, and Scars: Scientists ID the Facial Features Villains Have in Common

    As a whole, movie villains have a certain look: They’re usually not as good-looking as the movie’s hero, and have certain physical features that make them seem more evil than other characters. Scientists say villains have certain facial features in common, such as dark under-eye circles and wrinkles. For the study, researchers took a look at the all-time top 10 film heroes and villains from the American Film Institute’s 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List.

  • Can Pasta Sauce and Bloody Marys Really Fight Wrinkles?

    Lycopene, a key ingredient found in all varieties of tomatoes, was shown in the research to protect skin against sun-ray-induced damage. Skin biopsies showed that gene expression responsible for guarding cells against photo-aging and oxidative stress were greater in the group ingesting tomato carotenoids or lutein than in the group that was not. Research shows that ultraviolet exposure is the major preventable cause of skin aging, says Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

  • Why Are People Shaming Renee Zellweger for Looking Her Age?

    In a scathing article published on Monday, the Daily Mail picks apart Academy Award-winning actress Renée Zellweger for the crime of taking a bad photo while being 47 years old.

  • More Women Are Having Cosmetic Surgery to Boost Confidence

    A recent Allergan survey revealed that more women are getting cosmetic and plastic surgery to not only look better but also to boost their self-esteem. But does it really buy happiness?

  • Can Selfies Give You Wrinkles?

    Some dermatologists say that frequently using your smartphone, including taking selfies, may be speeding up skin aging and causing premature wrinkles.

  • Can Okra Really Help Get Rid of Acne and Reduce Wrinkles?

    An expert weighs in.​​

  • This High-Tech ‘Second Skin’ Breakthrough May Make Wrinkles a Thing of the Past

    This groundbreaking material can make your wrinkles and dry skin disappear.

  • The Makers of Botox Are Buying The Cream That Could Get Rid of Eye Bags

    We first broke news to you of XAF5 back in December of last year, unveiling some pretty hefty information about the cream, which may, one day, make blepharoplasty a thing of the past. XAF5 Ointment is a topical cream that’s used under the eyes. Expected to become available some time in 2018, the cream works to fight fat pockets under the eyes, which leads to bags and bulging.You May Also Like: Bags Vs. Hollows: What's the Difference? The cream was ...

  • Scientists May Have Just Found the Fountain of Youth

    Remember learning about cell structure in high school biology? You probably had to memorize that the mitochondria is the part that powers the cell, kind of like a battery.

  • Photographic Proof of What the Sun is Doing to Your Face

    These images reveal true sun damage — and you won't believe the extent.

  • The 10 Best Eye Creams to Tackle Wrinkles

    While we love our lines and own our age, our eyes do look better when plumped up by an amazing eye serum or cream. Here are our 10 favorites.

  • How I’m Preventing Wrinkles without Getting Botox

    While women in their 20s are now getting what’s called preventative Botox, I’m countering aging with a method I like to call “preventative moisture.”

  • 5 Things You Can Do Every Day to Prevent Wrinkles

    Sure there are innovative services available to help prevent wrinkles and even banish them once they’ve arrived but there are much simpler solutions that still work and don't cost a fortune.

  • 6 Seemingly Harmless Daily Habits That Could Be Aging You

    Sejal K. Shah, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist who utilizes the latest treatments and technologies to enhance her patients’ natural beauty. She has a private practice in Manhattan, and she teaches at the cosmetic clinic at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, where she received her degree.

  • Why Texting=Wrinkles: All About Modern Agers

    You’re painfully familiar with the usual wrinkle-causing, age-revealing suspects like sun exposure, sugar-laden diets, and stress. But these days, a whole new slew of technology-related agers are threatening our youth. Earlier this year Charlotte’s Book reported on the dreaded texting turkey neck, and that’s just the beginning—call them the unusual suspects of aging: from squinting at small screens to phacne (you guessed it—acne from your bacteria-laden phone), the modern world presents a skin-damaging obstacle course for anyone with a smart phone or laptop. We asked Charlotte’s Book Dr.