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  • Can This Company Kill the Travel Selfie?

    I may never take a selfie again. (Photo: Gonçalo Silva/Flytographer)

  • A Look at Cuban Street Style

    This story is part of a weeklong Yahoo series marking one year since the opening of relations between the United States and Cuba.HAVANA — From old-school, slick suits to American-flag prints, fashion on this city’s streets represents a country with one foot in the past and its eyes on the future. Fashion is embedded in Cuban culture, with African and Spanish influences as well as a dedication to color. The classic embroidered guayabera shirt, ubiquitous throughout Latin culture, is said to have come from a Cuban province. As the story goes, laborers made shirts out of bed sheets and added pockets for carrying cigars. In 2010, the Cuban government made it the official dress code of state functions.For women, traditional dress was the Bata Cubana, a brightly colored rumba dress with ruffled, flowing sleeves and a billowy skirt. These days, the Bata is reserved for cabaret costumes or formal occasions.  Modern-day shopping in Cuba is limited. Mass-produced, utilitarian clothing is the norm, with famous brands in only a handful of Havana stores due to strict laws surrounding sales and franchising of foreign businesses. And citizens have little access to mass media and the Internet to influence dress. But none of that stops Cubans from expressing their personal style — fashion there is dictated by the people themselves. Let Yahoo Travel inspire you every day. Hang out with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Check out our original adventure travel series, “A Broad Abroad.” See more stories and slideshows from U.S. & CUBA: ONE YEAR LATER >>>

  • Drone Footage: You've Never Seen Iceland Like This Before

    For the past few months, Iceland-based photographer Oli Haukur Myrdal — the talent behind OZZO Photography — has been putting his drone to the test. Using a high-tech camera and flight system, Mrydal has spent more than 80 hours flying over Iceland’s most amazing landscapes, covering almost 1,000 miles.  Related: Northern Lights, Lava and Rainbows: Stunning Photos of Iceland In this spectacular video, you can see the city of Reykjavik like you’ve never seen it before. The helicopter ride during twilight captures the immense beauty that is the capital of Iceland, soaring above the colorful rooftops, with views spanning to the lava fields that surround the cityscape.

  • 10 Eye-Catching Metro Stations Worth a Stop

    By Steven Casale Between running for the train and dealing with delays, a metro station is probably the last place to make you stop and have a look around. But across the globe, deep under the ground of some of the world’s largest cities, there are art installations, idiosyncratic designs, and thought-provoking motifs. Ahead, 10 of the most design-savvy examples around the world.More from Travel + Leisure:A Lauded War Photographer Rediscovers VietnamTake a Video Tour of Paris’ Largest Cemetery27 Incredible Art Exhibitions To Visit This FallOn the Migrant Trail: A Journey Into Europe’s Unfolding Crisis

  • Worth a Million Likes: Most Instagrammed Places in America

    By Robert Firpo-CappielloFrom legendary beaches to breathtaking national parks, some of the most Instagrammed places in America (according to BusBud’s new survey) are also brag-worthy travel destinations. Here, some of our very favorites.More from Budget Travel:More of the Most Instagrammed Places55 Incredibly Beautiful Photos of Fall Foliage25 Most Beautiful Cities in America 50 Cities Every American Should SeeWorld’s Most Beautiful Places

  • #Daydream: Sunrise in Bora Bora

    We know how it is. You’re stuck at your desk and the day seems to be going on forever. Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you.

  • #Daydream: The Tors at Serpentine Hot Springs, Shishmaref, Alaska

    Let’s go to… Photo: Bering Land Bridge National Preserve/Flickr …the Tors at Serpentine Hot Springs!!! Located in eastern Alaska, just across from Russia, is The Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, one of the most remote United States national park areas. Amidst the rolling tundra is a scenic valley where granite tors rise out of the ground and tower 100 feet above the land, surrounding the geothermal hot springs.

  • #Daydream: Sunset at Hidden Lake, Glacier National Park, Montana

    Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. Let’s go to… Photo:  JD Hascup/Flickr …Hidden Lake at Glacier National Park! This massive national park in Montana straddles the U.S.-Canadian border and boasts a staggering one million acres for you to explore.

  • #Daydream: The Marble Cathedral in Patagonia, Chile

    Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. The Marble Cathedral is located in a wild and inaccessible part of Chile.

  • #Daydream: Legzira, Morocco

    We know how it is. You’re stuck at your desk and the day seems to be going on forever. Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you.

  • #Daydream: Sunset at Mather Point, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you.

  • #Daydream: Aruba

    We know how it is. You’re stuck at your desk and the day seems to be going on forever. Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you.

  • #Daydream: Lago di Sorapis, Belluno, Italy

    Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you.

  • #Daydream: The Gardens at Marqueyssac, France

    Let’s go to… Photo by  BizanceNCo/Flickr …the Gardens at Marqueyssac, France! We love the Marqueyssac Gardens because they are so incredibly unique. Your time at the Marqueyssac Gardens will be amazing in any weather, and as beautiful as it is in the sunshine, a foggy day adds a lot of charm and magic to all those handsome hedges.

  • #Daydream: Valley of Dreams, New Mexico

    Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you.

  • #Daydream: Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur, California

    Let’s go to… Photo:  Cathy/Flickr …Pfeiffer Beach!!! Big Sur is one of our favorite places to dream about in California. Jack Kerouac, Henry Miller, Edward Weston, and Hunter S. Thompson have all been inspired to create after visiting this popular coastal area.

  • The Tower of London Bleeds Poppies in Remembrance of WWI

    Every once in awhile, an image strikes you in a deep way. This week it was seeing the sea of red ceramic poppies spilling from the Tower of London. The installation — called “Blood Swept Lands And Seas Of Red” — is to honor the British and Commonwealth soldiers killed in World War I. Currently, there are 120,000 poppies, and the number will grow in the coming months — to eventually reach 888,246, representing every British and Commonwealth soldier killed in the war. Artist Paul Cummins’ poppies, which took three days (each!) to make, will be sold for £25 ($42), and the money will be donated to charities for veterans.Take a stroll through these beautiful poppies with us.

  • Snowmageddon Got You Down? Here Are 10 Places That Will Warm Your Toes

    If you live in the Northeastern United States or you were just unlucky enough to be visiting, you won’t be seeing much today, other than the walls of your home or the airport, and a blur of snow outside the window. The Great Blizzard of 2015 is wreaking white havoc from Philadelphia to New York to Boston, with thousands of flights canceled and no relief expected through Tuesday.So if you’re getting cabin fever, we’ve got the perfect cure: a slideshow of places around the world where it’s actually 80 degrees or warmer right now, with no snow but enough sun. So fix yourself a daiquiri and imagine yourself in shorts until the thaw comes.

  • They Will Rock You: Up Close with the Mysterious Moving Rocks of Death Valley

    Visit the Racetrack in Death Valley National Park, and you could be fooled into thinking you’ve stumbled upon a massive modern-art exhibit in the middle of the desert. The playa’s surface is impeccably flat, with cracked, dry mud that looks like a field of subway tiles, a black island placed to the side, and rocks that are standing perfectly still yet have long trails behind them. An artist’s obscure statement on life, perhaps? Nope, the only artist here is Mother Nature. If the Racetrack looks like a dried-up lake, that’s because it is — the result of climate changes thousands of years ago. Like Stonehenge, the mystery of how the rocks actually moved on the playa has long remained unsolved. Until this year, that is, thanks to some resourceful scientists. (Click ahead to find out what they discovered.) My friend Doug and I took a road trip to Death Valley recently, and we saved the Racetrack for last. Getting there may shake up your vehicle — and you — but you’ll be rewarded with a surreal landscape you’ll never forget. Stick around after the tourists leave at sunset, and you’ve got the playa all to yourself under a brilliant starry sky. You might feel like the only person on the planet — and that planet may not seem like Earth. Here’s are some photos from our trip that will show you how unforgettable a visit to the Racetrack is, starting with a giant crater, then a signpost festooned with real teakettles, and finally the wonders of the rocks.

  • Abandoned Ghost Town Found Right in the Middle of a National Park

    Going for a hike in a national park will usually lead to Instagram-ready vistas, abundant wildlife, or swimming holes. But explore the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, as one photographer did, and you’ll find the decayed remains of an exclusive hotel and empty logging town that surrounded it.Jordan Liles hiked through the historic Elkmont Historic District of eastern Tennessee last year and captured some eerie photos and video of the remaining buildings – some on the verge of collapsing, others safe enough to walk into. The centerpiece of the ghost town is the Wonderland Club Hotel, which first opened in 1912 to the general public but became a private club soon after.All that’s left of Wonderland is one boarded-up two-story building, and nearby is an exposed fireplace with a few stairs that lead to nowhere.The town of Elkmont is abandoned today, but it wasn’t all at once. The cottage owners were given lifetime leases in the early 1930s after the park was established, but in 1992 the National Park Service refused to renew them. The population gradually died out, and by about 2001, it was all empty.Liles told Yahoo Travel that he wanted to emphasize that last fact, as a common misconception to his photos is that the town hasn’t been inhabited in 100 years. He also wanted to point out that he didn’t discover any of the structures — they’re well known to east Tennessee locals. “I just brought a camera. That’s all!” Liles said.Click through the above slideshow for a photo tour of the area, and see Liles’ video for a guided tour.

  • Daredevil Photographer Snaps Incredible Photos From World's Highest Buildings

    Up in the sky, look: It’s a bird. It’s a plane. It’s … Andrew Tso.Like a real-life Superman, Andrew Tso leaps atop tall buildings — maybe not with a single bound. But the dizzying images he captures from skyscrapers look superhuman, indeed.The Hong Kong-based photographer has made a career out of scaling buildings around the globe: London, Paris, Toronto, Hong Kong, Toronto, Seoul, the list goes on. And the 26-year-old self-proclaimed “rooftopper” has been climbing buildings since he was a kid. “Being at the top is always a thrill, and no matter what people say about being fearless, there’s always an element of uncertainty and fear,” Tso told the Daily Mail. “Sometimes you just have to put yourself in an awkward/unsure situation to capture what you want.”If you’re afraid of heights, these awe-inspiring shots might not be for you. You can check out more of Tso’s work on Tumblr, Facebook and Instagram.

  • Mind-Blowing Instragram Shots That Will Make You Want to Travel the World

    There are 196 countries in the world. Which means there are countless cultures, traditions, and delicacies to try. If you’re contemplating taking a trip, but can’t quite pull the trigger, these Instagram photos will inspire you to book your next trip…now!

  • How a NatGeo Photographer Took These Mind-Blowing Winter Yellowstone Shots

    Photographing Yellowstone National Park in winter feels like a behind-the-scenes tour of nature: you have it all to yourself and everything slows down, opens up, and invites you in. Even the bison seem more relaxed and willing to get close to you (but don’t get too close).This creates a majestic tableau for snapping the photos of your life, and to see how it’s done I tagged along with Ken Geiger, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who was leading a National Geographic Expedition of the park. The incredible photos from this slideshow were all taken by Geiger during our six days around the Lamar Valley, Mammoth Hot Springs, Old Faithful, and elsewhere in Yellowstone. Each photo includes a winter photography tip that explains how he captured the shot.There’s no better way to develop an inferiority complex, but also no better way to learn the craft, than to watch a pro work and do in a split second what it would take an ordinary photographer years to get right. Blink in the wild and you might miss Geiger sneaking off to catch a fox in mid-dive for its prey, or getting on his belly to capture a vantage point you never would have thought of.This was Geiger’s first winter visit to Yellowstone, as it was mine, and we got spoiled during our first full day in the park. Riding toward Lamar Valley, in the northwestern portion of the park, we struck white gold in the plains: a huge herd of bison, who would have been picturesque enough, began to get dusted with falling snow.“The magic started for me when we made that first stop,” Geiger said. And everybody was out on the side of the road. And I had this kind of “OK we’re on the side of the road and the light’s not great and I want things to be a little more special. And then it got that way – it started snowing. Bison in the snow with that fluffy snow where it lasted quite a while, made some lasting images. A lot of people responded to that moment and that maybe even set the bar for the rest of the trip.”Geiger was generous with his time in helping me learn how to frame a shot, and I had a few takeaways from the trip: my snow photos were too underexposed, my sunset photos were too overexposed, I was taking too many vertical photos when horizontal or square ones were better, and I needed to be sure to frame each shot with an entry point to draw the eye.Geiger used an array of toys on this trip: He carried three Canon 5D Mark III cameras – one was converted to infrared for black and white photos, and one was equipped with a massive 600 F4 lens that I could barely keep steady. He also used his iPhone for square photos, and a GoPro to capture a herd of bison walking in front of our snow coach.Let Yahoo Travel inspire you every day. Hang out with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Check out our original adventure travel series A Broad Abroad. Learn more about our travel policy.

  • #Daydream: Kawasan Falls, Philippines

    We know how it is. You’re stuck at your desk and the day seems to be going on forever. Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you. Every day at 3 p.m. Eastern, we’ll send you a picture of the place we at Yahoo Travel are daydreaming about so we can all take that mental vacation together. Let’s go to…

  • #Daydream: Cumberland Island, Georgia

    We know how it is. You’re stuck at your desk and the day seems to be going on forever. Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you. Every day at 3 p.m. Eastern, we’ll send you a picture of the place we at Yahoo Travel are daydreaming about so we can all take that mental vacation together. Let’s go to…

  • #Daydream: Kerið Crater Lake, Iceland

    We know how it is. You’re stuck at your desk and the day seems to be going on forever. Your mind starts to wander — at first to “anywhere but here,” but then to exotic, faraway lands where your everyday problems and stress melt in the presence of true paradise. You want to go to there, and we want to go with you. Every day at 3 p.m. Eastern, we’ll send you a picture of the place we at Yahoo Travel are daydreaming about so we can all take that mental vacation together. Let’s go to…