matcha

  • What Beauty Products Does A Holistic Health Coach Keep In Her Purse?

    Because what you put on your body is just as important as what you put in it.

  • 3 Holiday Cocktails Made with Superfoods

    The holiday season is a time of celebration, which means many parties to attend, toasts (not the avocado kind) included. So, you might as well make sure your cocktails are chock full of healthy ingredients (hello, matcha tea, carrot juice, and fresh-pressed beets) to help balance out the role that alcohol plays in your cup of holiday cheer. That’s the kind of inspiration you get hanging out with Grant Wheeler, the beverage director at Den Hospitality, which owns super trendy cocktail bars The Garret East and The Garret West in Manhattan. Wheeler’s a big proponent of shaking and stirring with superfood mixers.

  • No-Churn Matcha Ice Cream from ‘Simply Nigella’

    Every week, Yahoo Food spotlights a cookbook that stands out from all the rest. This week’s cookbook is Simply Nigella: Feel Good Food by Nigella Lawson (Flatiron Books). Photo: Keiko Oikawa  By Nigella Lawson No-Churn Matcha Ice Cream Makes approximately 1 quart  I love matcha ice cream, and this version gives me particular pleasure. Yes, it’s ridiculously easy to make, which is gratifying, but more glorious – and important – is the perfect balance between the sophisticated bitterness of the matcha powder and the uncompromisingly childish sweetness of the condensed milk.

  • Upgrade Your Almond Milk

    If you’ve mastered making almond milk—almonds, water, dates, blend—it’s time for an upgrade. By soaking your organic almonds for three hours (or overnight), the almonds are converted to a living food with greater nutrient bioavailability. The process of soaking the almonds removes the protease inhibitors, which stop the nuts from germinating. Concurrently, it increases the protein content, decreases the fat content and enables greater absorption of the almond’s minerals, including calcium and magnesium. 

  • Want to Lose Weight? Try Matcha

    It may be time to replace your loose leaves or cup of coffee with matcha. A powdered form of steamed and dried green tea leaves that has been used in Japanese tea ceremonies for centuries, matcha tastes like a grassier, brighter version of the regular stuff. Think of it as the “healthy espresso of green tea,” say David Mandelbaum and Jessica Lloyd, owners of matcha purveyor Panatea. A study found that one serving of matcha has 137 times more disease-fighting polyphenols, called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), than a brewed mug of conventional China Green Tips — the equivalent of up to 10 cups of regular green tea! With such an antioxidant punch, it’s no wonder that matcha just may be the new superfood.

  • How (and Why) to Include Matcha in Your Anti-Aging Regimen

    Edited and adapted for Charlottesbook.com Despite its numerous and much publicized benefits, green tea was not a habit I readily adopted. I never liked the grassy taste, and I preferred the tangible buzz that black tea provides—but my whole attitude towards green tea turned around when I tried a matcha latte. Frothy and delicious with a powerful kick of energy, one cup of matcha made me a green tea convert. As opposed to steeping your tea leaves, Matcha is made from blending the finely ground tea leaves into hot water to make a beautiful, vibrantly green, chlorophyll-rich beverage.