anger

  • What Justin Bieber Can Teach Us About Anger Management

    Bieber became angry after one of his fans spilled something on the stage and he was blocked from trying to mop it up, TMZ reports. I’m not doing the show.” Hours later, Bieber posted a message on Instagram, apologizing to fans for his behavior. “In no way did I mean to come across mean, but chose to end the show as the people in the front row would not listen.” (Image: Justin Bieber | Instagram)  He also said he’s working to be more level-headed: "Hopefully people will understand where I am coming from. I don’t always handle things the right way, but I’m human and I’m working on getting better at responding not reacting.” This isn’t the first time this week that emotions have gotten the better of Bieber: He also walked out of an interview on Wednesday with a Spanish radio station.  But experts say his recent comment about “responding, not reacting” is an important one.

  • Why Women Don't Benefit From Office Rage

    Image via Shutterstock Guys can blow a fuse and be respected for it, but women? Not so much, according to a new study that reveals an apparent double standard in the way we react to angry people, Pacific Standard reports. “Our results lend scientific support to a frequent claim voiced by women, sometimes dismissed as paranoia,” that their “impassioned” arguments are dismissed because they’re female, say study leads Jessica Salerno and Liana Peter-Hagene.  Related: Try This Sit-Stand Formula for Every 30 Minutes at Work Published in Law and Human Behavior, the study had 210 “jury-eligible undergraduates” learn about the real-life trial of a man who allegedly murdered his wife.