Supreme Court: Booking.com can trademark its name

The Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
The Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says travel website Booking.com can trademark its name, a ruling that also impacts other companies whose name is a generic word followed by “.com.”

The high court issued its 8-1 ruling Tuesday. Lower courts had sided with Booking.com, but the Trump administration had appealed to the Supreme Court.

“We have no cause to deny Booking.com the same benefits Congress accorded other marks qualifying as nongeneric,” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote for the majority of the court.

Justice Stephen Breyer dissented.

Other businesses including Cars.com, Dictionary.com, Newspapers.com and Wine.com had said the outcome in the case would affect their ability to trademark their names too.

The case was the first of 10 cases argued by telephone in May because of the coronavirus pandemic. It was also the first time audio of arguments was available live.

The case is United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B.V., 19-46.

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