Stacey Abrams shared her evolution on abortion policy: 'I was anti-abortion until I went to college'

·2 min read
Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams talks with the press after a group discussion with women impacted by miscarriage in Atlanta, Georgia, United States on August 03, 2022.
Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams talks with the press after a group discussion with women impacted by miscarriage in Atlanta, Georgia, United States on August 03, 2022.Nathan Posner/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
  • Stacey Abrams said she used to be anti-abortion in her college years due to her Christian faith.

  • She said she changed her mind after she learned what "abortion care really is."

  • Abrams is the Democratic candidate for governor of Georgia, where abortion is mostly banned after six weeks.

Stacey Abrams, the Democratic candidate for governor of Georgia, said she used to be anti-abortion many years ago, but eventually changed her stance.

Abrams, a staunch advocate of abortion rights in a state where the procedure is mostly banned after six weeks, told CNN's Dana Bash on Sunday that her Christian faith influenced her perspective.

"I have thought about my faith a great deal. I was anti-abortion until I went to college," Abrams said. "And, there, I met a friend who has my shared faith values, but we started having conversations about what reproductive care and abortion care really is."

"She was able to give me a different perspective," Abrams added. "And over the course of the next few years, I really started thinking about, what role should the legislature play? What role should government play?"

 

Abrams is also the daughter of two retired United Methodist pastors.

"This is health care. This is about a woman's right to control her body. This is about a woman's right to experience and determine her future. And that, for me, as a matter of faith, means that I don't impose those value systems on others," Abrams said. "More importantly, I protect her rights. I protect her humanity, and that should be my responsibility."

In the weeks following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, a judicial order allowed a 2019 Georgia law banning abortion after six weeks to go into effect.

Gov. Brian Kemp, Abrams' opponent in the race, praised the order, saying it "affirms our promise to protect life at all stages."

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