St. Patrick's Day Is During the Week This Year—Here's What to Know

Erin Cavoto
·2 min read

From The Pioneer Woman

For some, St. Patrick's Day is celebrated by busting out your favorite Irish-inspired recipes like soda bread and corned beef and cabbage. In addition to the classic dishes of the day, some of Ree Drummond's other favorites include a rich grilled cheese made with Irish cheddar and mustard and a cozy Sunday stew using lamb instead of beef. You might also watch fun St. Patrick's Day movies with your family or decorate your house with rainbow and gold touches.

There's one crucial question to ask before planning your festivities, though: When is St. Patrick's Day in 2021? Having in mind what day of the week it'll fall this year will help you decide whether you want to celebrate on the actual day or save your big dinner for the weekend. It doesn't matter whether you're Irish or not come St. Paddy's Day—anyone can join in on the fun!

Photo credit: Funwithfood - Getty Images
Photo credit: Funwithfood - Getty Images

When is St. Patrick's Day in 2021?

Even though St. Patrick's Day keeps the same date every year—March 17—the day of the week obviously changes. In 2021, St. Patrick's Day falls on Wednesday, March 17.

Coming in right in the middle of the week means you might have to shift some plans to squeeze in all of your favorite activities. For instance, you could make cute St. Patrick's Day crafts with your kids the weekend before and have a party with your household the following Friday. But nothing is stopping you from indulging in an Irish coffee come March 17!

Is St. Patrick's Day always on March 17?

Yes! The earliest observance of St. Patrick's Day dates back to Ireland in the 1600s. It began as—and remains—a religious day to recognize the death of St. Patrick, Ireland's patron saint who brought Christianity to the country. Because it's a feast day in Christianity, the date remains March 17.

The holiday as we know it today, with parades, parties, and more, emerged from Irish-Americans in the 1800s, Time reports. By the end of the century, big cities like Boston, New York, and Chicago were hosting major celebrations for everyone to take part in on or around March 17. So funnily enough, the St. Patrick's Day festivities we know today are more American than Irish!