Sony’s Newest High-Def TV Uses Cognitive Intelligence to Create a More Lifelike Picture

Martin Lerma
·2 min read

Sony’s latest TV release is taking the viewing experience to new heights by giving it a groundbreaking human touch.

The Japanese tech giant has spent years finetuning its most experimental processors. Its latest models, unveiled at this year’s virtual Consumer Electronics show, are the first to use cognitive intelligence to improve picture quality. The Cognitive Processor XR, found in the XR LED and OLED models in Sony’s Bravia range, builds on previous chips that used artificial intelligence to adjust things like color and brightness. The most recent iterations up the ante on this performance, analyzing the entire image frame as a whole and homing in on specific areas to enhance. With this technology, TVs can even target sound positions based on what’s being displayed.

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Collectively, these elements are intended to give you a more life-like viewing experience by mimicking how humans actually take in the world around them and boosting specific focal points. As a bonus, it also helps improve overall picture quality. Because the processor helps detect what’s most important on the display, it can then optimize its wealth of pixels to concentrate on that area of the screen in real-time.

This particular launch coincides with a host of other new products from Sony, not to mention bundles of new features for each. All of the XR TVs will be compatible with both Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant courtesy of hands-free voice activation. Each minimalist, slender design also comes with an anti-reflective screen so the sharp picture can be seen to maximum advantage, regardless of a room’s given lighting conditions. What’s interesting is that there’s no announcement for anything akin to Samsung and LG’s highly-touted microLED technology that recently debuted in more home-friendly sizes.

Sony’s offering includes 8K, 4K, and 4K OLED screens. No details on pricing or availability have yet been divulged, but they are expected to become public sometime this spring.

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