Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's daughter Lilibet could grow up to be president, but only if she doesn't take a royal title

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harry and meghan justice desk cae town
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex in Cape Town. COURTNEY AFRICA/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
  • Meghan and Harry's daughter Lilibet could become president of the United States.

  • Lili is eligible to hold office, so long as she doesn't accept a royal title.

  • She is due to become a princess when Prince Charles takes the throne.

  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

Royal baby Lilibet Diana Mountbatten-Windsor could be eligible to become president of the United States - but only if she cuts ties to the British monarchy.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's daughter Lili was born in Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital on Friday. She is eighth in line to the throne, and currently doesn't have a royal title.

However, she could be granted a princess title when her grandfather Prince Charles becomes king. This is due to Letters Patent 1917, an ancient decree which states that the grandchildren in the male line of the reigning monarch are eligible to receive royal titles.

As long as she doesn't use her title, Lili could become the first British royal to also become an elected official in the US.

The Constitution prevents the president from accepting titles from foreign states

According to the requirements to hold office stated in the US Constitution, the president must be a natural-born citizen, be at least 35 years old, and have been a resident of the United States for at least 14 years.

The Constitution also states that elected officials must not accept titles from foreign states, as noted in The Foreign Emoluments Clause.

Lili's position in the line of succession means there would be a "conflict of interest" should she decide to start a political career in the US, royal commentator Kinsey Schofield told Insider.

"Lili would have to renounce her claim to the throne or seek an exemption from Congress to even run for president of the United States of America," Schofield, founder of To Di For Daily, told Insider.

Royal historian Marlene Koenig told Insider that even though Lili and her brother Archie will be entitled to titles when Charles becomes king, "that does not mean they would be styled as such."

"The precedent is the Wessex kids who are grandchildren of the sovereign in the male line," she said, referencing Prince Edward's children, Lady Louise Windsor and James, Viscount Severn.

As grandchildren of the current monarch, Louise and James are technically "prince" and "princess," even though they weren't officially granted these titles at birth.

Lili will still be considered a princess to society, with or without a title - which could cause problems for a potential political career.

"If she receives the type of media attention that her parents do, they will likely refer to her as Princess Lili the same way Diana was still considered a princess after her divorce. While she might be able to escape the position, she will have a hard time escaping the title," Schofield said.

The same rules apply to Lili's older brother, Archie Harrison. Archie was born in the UK, however since his mother is American this makes him a dual citizen, and therefore a "natural born citizen."

The phrase "natural born citizen" includes individuals who were born abroad but are American citizens at birth based on the citizenship of their parents, according to Harvard Law Review.

Representatives for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

Harry and Markle's team has pushed back on critics who say royals should remain politically neutral

As members of a constitutional monarchy, British royals are supposed to remain politically neutral, and cannot be seen as trying to influence parliamentary decisions in the UK.

However, the extent to which non-working royals are expected to remain politically neutral in other countries is ambiguous.

Markle and Harry faced criticism for encouraging US citizens to vote in the presidential election after they stepped back from royal duties in March 2020.

The Queen's staff told The Times of London last September that the royal household should "put more distance" between itself and the couple because they broke protocol by getting involved with politics.

A spokesperson for the couple rejected these claims, telling Insider that Harry and Markle have no plans to stop talking about the subject anytime soon.

"Part of being an active member of society is to take part in the democratic process," the spokesperson told Insider in November. "So encouraging people to get involved in politics is something that is important."

"Obviously it is at a very important part of the American election cycle at the moment, but that doesn't mean it's specific to this time," they added.

Read the original article on Insider