Prince Charles to give up Duchy Organics farm as non-royal tenant takes over

Rebecca Taylor
·Royal Correspondent
·2 mins read

Prince Charles won’t be renewing the lease on his organic farm, because it could interfere when he eventually becomes king.

It’s understood Charles, 71, would have had to sign another 20 year lease on Home Farm, the 1,000 acre plot near Highgrove in Gloucestershire.

Clarence House confirmed he would not be renewing the lease next Spring.

Charles is the longest serving heir to the throne, and has spent nearly seven decades as a king in waiting.

William and Charles on Duchy Home Farm in Gloucestershire. Charles won't be renewing the lease, it's been confirmed. (UK Press)
William and Charles on Duchy Home Farm in Gloucestershire. Charles won't be renewing the lease, it's been confirmed. (UK Press)

While he is very busy in his royal duties now, he would be busier as the monarch and unable to maintain a farm.

Produce from the farm was used to start the Duchy Originals brand, now known as Waitrose Duchy Organic.

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Prince Charles samples beer during a reception to celebrate the 21st anniversary of Duchy Originals products at Clarence House in 2013. (Getty Images)
Prince Charles samples beer during a reception to celebrate the 21st anniversary of Duchy Originals products at Clarence House in 2013. (Getty Images)

A Clarence House spokesman said: “The Prince of Wales will not be renewing his lease on Home Farm but will continue to farm organically at Sandringham.”

He has been farming the land at Home Farm for 35 years.

Highgrove and Home Farm are owned by the Duchy of Cornwall and leased by the prince, who is the current Duke of Cornwall.

A new tenant has been found for Home Farm, but not been named. The new tenant is not royal but will continue the relationship with Waitrose Duchy Organic.

Charles will keep his country home of Highgrove, where he has been living in recent weeks since leaving Scotland, and won’t set up a new home at Sandringham.

Charles will retain Highgrove House, his country home in Gloucestershire. (Getty Images)
Charles will retain Highgrove House, his country home in Gloucestershire. (Getty Images)

The prince already runs the farm at Sandringham, having taken over from his father the Duke of Edinburgh. The Norfolk farm also uses organic practices.

Charles was mocked in the 1980s as an early adopter of organic farming, as well as for his planting in lunar cycles and using homeopathic remedies. But many of his methods have been followed by others.

While Charles became heir at just three years old, he did not formally begin many of his royal roles until he had finished university.

In recent years, he has been the most senior royal carrying out trips abroad on behalf of his mother, and has taken over the role of head of the Commonwealth, after the Queen lobbied for him to be appointed as her replacement.

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