This Is What Pride Looks Like in 2020

·8 min read
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Cosmopolitan

The music in the streets and the roar of the parade. The confetti-covered sidewalks and glitter stuck to your skin for weeks. The boozy brunches that become dance parties. The icons. The events. The outfits. The rainbows that arc across the world and flags shimmying in the breeze. The people: laughing, crying, singing. These are some memories that snap to mind when we think about Pride. But, of course, this year will look different.

In 2020, people will experience Pride in places just beginning to reopen or where everyone is still staying home because of the pandemic. They will mourn all we’ve lost and protest for a better future. The commemoration of Pride is collective; the way it will be observed is as diverse and beautiful as the community itself. Below, people across America share their plans and reflections. And the one thing that has not changed at bit? We are all in this together.

Shangela

“We’re all going through the same experience at the same time in all these places around the world. Hopefully, that will bring us back to what Pride is really about: the celebration of community and a reminder that it’s important to support each other, to stand together with each other for what is right—for equality, progress, humanity, and compassion.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Kahh Spence

“Originally, I was going to celebrate. Now, I’m researching ways to support the Black community instead.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Monique Gardner

“Some people have lost family members or friends. Some people have lost their jobs. Not everybody is in a place where they want to party. I’m trying to respect where everybody’s at.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Jonica T. Gibbs

“Right now is a time of reflection on all that I have been blessed with, including the freedom to live my life on my own terms with the support of my family and friends. I don’t take their love and acceptance for granted because there was a time in my life when I was not sure if it would be possible to attain.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Alex Newell

“Pride isn’t the parties. It’s not the parades. It’s being proud of yourself and your community. It’s all about hope. Also, if Betty White and Cicely Tyson survived the Spanish Flu, we can get through this pandemic!”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Kidd Kenn

“My advice: Just treat this year like you would even if we had the parade and the events. Dress up. Look cute. Post pictures. Represent.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Ruby Rose

“I urge people to educate themselves about how they can continue to fight for the cause and for justice. To remember the people who fought for us to have Pride. To pray for those who are suffering. To think about the people in our community who have been taken from us, especially the trans community and trans POC. If you can: Donate, sign petitions, and use your platform to keep spreading awareness.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Brad Mondo

“I’m such a baby. I tear up every year when I walk down the street during the parade. At the end of the day, it’s about our community celebrating what we’ve been through, how far we’ve come, and—above all—being proud to be LGBTQ+.”



Bobby Berk

“I’m more of a brunch and pajamas kind of Pride person. But this year, I’m just trying to make it as much of a virtual party as possible. There are a lot of young people stuck at home in bad situations. In 2020, it’s extra important to be out there and visible for them.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Byron Cordero

“The pandemic has allowed me to tap into my spirituality again. Every Sunday since lockdown, I’ve tuned into Liquid Church online services. Through my faith, I’ve regained consciousness of who we are to one another: brothers and sisters. That is Pride to me—coming together in unison, no matter how different, and realizing that we all share one thing: love.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Adam Rippon

“My plan: sit on my couch, drink a delicious White Claw, FaceTime my boyfriend (who has been in Finland throughout the quarantine), and celebrate all the good things I have in my life. I will also be tracking down old photos of myself when I was in the closet (often wearing two polos at one time with both collars popped) to post for a #TBT telling my younger self to just keep doing my thing...and that, once I cool it with the two polos, life will start to get so much better for so many reasons.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Steven Canals

“I’m thinking about all of the front-line workers—some of whom are dear friends, some of whom are LGBTQ+—ensuring that others are taken care of. That’s what I’m truly proud of.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned



Devin-Norelle

“My quarantine crew and I will likely do boozy brunch situation with some board games. I bought one back in January that’s called…Pandemic. Yes, seriously.”

Tess Holliday

“We all have to make sure that we are using our platforms as a way to elevate voices that maybe don’t get heard or seen as often. It can be as simple as making sure that you’re leaving supportive comments and Likes on posts that represent our beautiful, diverse community.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Deja Smith

“Rum punch and enjoying herbal refreshments as I wake, bake, and repeat. It’s going to be lit.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Desi Sulca

“Honoring Black trans lives is really important for me, and that means giving back to the Black trans community: listening to them, reading about them, honoring them, and donating to organizations like The Okra Project.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Rickey Thompson

“Pride doesn’t have to be just one month. We can celebrate all year long.”

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Photo credit: Hearst Owned



Alexander DeLuca

“On the bright side, I don’t have to anguish for hours about what I am going to wear before going to a warehouse party in Brooklyn where I feel fate will deliver me a husband!”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Gaby Dunn

My queer friends around the world and I are going to do a live reading of a ‘straight movie’ and make it queer under the hashtag #MakeItGay.”

Eva Reign

“My sister and I are going to be chilling on the patio, blasting music, and taking time to enjoy a cocktail or two along with the recent legalization of marijuana in Illinois. Life is fairly stressful right now, so it’s the perfect time to partake.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned


Rachel Sharp & Sean

“Pride looks different this year, but it definitely isn’t canceled. We are Pride.”

Brayan Ruiz Rivera

“Pride celebrations have given me the space to express myself in a way that I thought was never possible. This year, in honor of all the strength, love, and beauty that still surrounds us, I want to keep that energy going.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned


Theo Germaine

“I think it’s a great thing so many events are going virtual this year. Many Pride events are not inclusive to disabled members of the LGBTQ community. My wish is that any future in-person events will take better steps to include the members of our community who have disabilities because there’s a lot of unchecked ableism.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Chantel Carter & Shana Sumers

“Not being able to have in-person events puts the focus on issues that are still unresolved, supporting LGBTQ+ companies and organizations, and taking action in spaces that need it.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Emily Winokur

“The world is my oyster. I’m here to be gay AF in it.”

Holly Hale & Paige Bethmann

“We’re really looking forward to a more romantic celebration of our partnership. With all the nostalgia that accompanies this time of the year, it’s comforting to retell stories of Prides from the past and relive those experiences through each other.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Vinny Gaga

“I plan to celebrate with my gay older brother, one of my favorite people in the world. The virus can stop social gatherings and parties, but it definitely won’t stop the beautiful spirit Pride is all about. I’m Vinny and I was #BornThisWay!”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned


The Aces

“We’re going to set up a makeshift kiddie pool with a disco light!”

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Photo credit: Hearst Owned


Jackie Abbott

“I’ll be on the couch with my tuxedo cat and a glass of wine, watching the newest lesbian love story documentary, A Secret Love. Throw in finishing my fourth Jeanette Winterson book of quarantine and you have possibly the most lez Sunday plan.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

pineappleCITI

“We will get through this as a culture, as a nation, and as human beings. The best thing that we do is continue spreading the love. That is what Pride is all about.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

For ways to support the Black Trans Lives Matter movement right now, check out our guide.

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

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