Photo Agency Flags Princess Kate’s Cancer Announcement Video With a Disclaimer—Here’s Why


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The Princess of Wales’s doctored photo drama isn’t over yet. Royal watchers recently noticed that major photo agency Getty Images issued an editor’s note for the video Kensington Palace released of Princess Kate announcing her cancer diagnosis last month. But the note may be more innocuous than some conspiracy theorists would have you believe.

The disclaimer reads: “This Handout clip was provided by a third-party organization and may not adhere to Getty Images’ editorial policy.”

A spokesperson for the photo agency explained the editor’s note in a statement to People, saying the agency was just following protocol: “Getty Images includes a standard editor’s note to handout content provided by third-party organizations.” In this case, the third-party organizations would be BBC Studios and Kensington Palace, which worked together to film the clip of the royal at Windsor Castle on March 20.

The video, released on March 22, shows Kate sitting on a bench in a garden. In it, she reveals that doctors identified the presence of cancer following an abdominal surgery she underwent in January.

“This of course came as a huge shock, and William and I have been doing everything we can to process and manage this privately for the sake of our young family,” she says. “We hope that you will understand that, as a family, we now need some time, space, and privacy while I complete my treatment. My work has always brought me a deep sense of joy, and I look forward to being back when I’m able, but for now I must focus on making a full recovery.”

Kate’s shocking health news came amid months of rumors about the princess’s absence from public duties, which the palace said was due to her recovery from surgery. The speculation reached a fever pitch when the palace released a portrait of Kate posing with her three children to mark Britain’s Mother’s Day on March 10. Shortly after, major photo agencies killed the photo due to evidence of digital manipulation. The unprecedented move led the palace to issue an apology attributed to Kate, who admitted to “occasionally experiment[ing] with [photo] editing.”

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