O.J. Simpson's Executor Wants the Goldman Family to Get 'Nothing' From His Estate

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O.J. Simpson owed the family of Ron Goldman more than $100 million at the time of his death, but the executor of his will says he'll do everything in his power to see that they don't receive any of it.

Though Simpson, who died from prostate cancer on April 10, was acquitted in a criminal trial for the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Goldman, he was later found liable in a civil trial and ordered to pay the Goldman family $33.5 million. However, according to 2022 legal filings, he had only given the family $133,000 since the 1997 trial. With interest accrued, that amount now totals $114 million, according to People.

Simpson's longtime lawyer Malcolm LaVergne, who was named as the executor of his estate, told the Las Vegas Review-Journal that it's his "hope" that the Goldmans "get zero, nothing." "Them specifically," he added. "And I will do everything in my capacity as the executor or personal representative to try and ensure that they get nothing."

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LaVergne explained that the point of contention was Simpson's 2006 ghostwritten book, If I Did It. After the publication was initially canceled, the Goldman family later sued and won right to the book, which they published in 2007 with the revised title, If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer.

The legal documents for Simpson's estate names his son Justin Simpson as his successor, and that all his property be placed in The Orenthal Simpson Revocable Living Trust.

The documents also state that it would be "administered as set forth herein without litigation or dispute of any kind” and that if a beneficiary, heir “or any other person” seeks to "set aside the administration of this Will, have this Will declared null, void or diminish, or to defeat any change any part of the provisions of this will,” that they'd “receive, free of trust, one dollar ($1.00) and no more in lieu of any claimed interest in this will or its assets."

LaVergne said it's currently unclear how much Simpson's estate is worth. "I can’t make a predication right now as to what the value of the estate is," he said.

Attorney David Cook, who represents Fred Goldman, Ron's father, says that Simpson still "owes on the current status of the judgment," and it seems like the family is setting up what will likely be a contentious legal battle.

"He died without penance," Cook said, referring to Simpson. “He did not want to give a dime, a nickel to Fred, never, anything, never."