Normani Opened Up About Struggling With Insecurities During Her Childhood

Starr Bowenbank
Photo credit: Instagram
Photo credit: Instagram

From Cosmopolitan

  • Normani penned a essay for Allure, in which she spoke about the pressure to adhere to specific beauty standards when she was a kid.

  • Normani is now becoming more acquainted with who she is and feels like she's only competing with herself.

It's hard to believe that Normani—yes, the Normani who took the world by storm last year with her now legendary VMAs performance—could ever struggle with having self-confidence, but as it turns out, she's just like the rest of us. In an essay for Allure, Normani candidly spoke about some of her childhood insecurities and what it was like to grow up being one of the few Black girls in her school.

"I was one of three little Black kids in the whole school and I remember asking my mom to straighten my hair, wishing my eyes were a little bit lighter, because that was the standard. Every Black girl should be able to look at the television screen and see herself as beautiful," she wrote.

Unfortunately, this feeling didn't go away quickly—it followed her as she became a member of Fifth Harmony. "It was obvious — I was the only significantly darker, African-American [member]. Knowing that I looked different sometimes, I think, definitely altered the way that I felt," she said. (Reminder: Normani often was targeted by racist trolls while in the group and felt understandably disappointed when Camila Cabello's racist Tumblr posts resurfaced recently.)

Thankfully, Normani is coming to terms with who she is now. Her mother and grandmother have been able to provide a strong support system, and she's now discovering even more parts of her identity. "I think I'm just discovering who I am, to be quite honest," she said. "And it's not me in contest with anybody else; it's me in competition with myself."

And you know what? We absolutely love to see it!

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