The Minneapolis Police Department trained its officers to use the neck restraint that led to George Floyd's killing, according to court documents

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Protesters hold signs that says, "Black Lives Matter" a painted portraits of George Floyd with the Pan-African colors of Red, Black and Green behind them as they walk with thousands of protesters from Cadman Plaza to take part in the peaceful protest across the Brooklyn Bridge.
Protesters hold signs that says, "Black Lives Matter" a painted portraits of George Floyd with the Pan-African colors of Red, Black and Green behind them as they walk with thousands of protesters from Cadman Plaza to take part in the peaceful protest across the Brooklyn Bridge.

Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

  • The Minnesota Police Department included instructions on how to use a controversial neck restraint in its training manual, according to court documents, the same type of restraint that was used on George Floyd. 

  • The court documents, obtained by The Daily Beast on Wednesday, were included in a motion to dismiss charges against Thomas Lane, one of the three police officers that didn't intervene while then-officer Derek Chauvin was kneeling on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes before his May 25 death. 

  • In the Minneapolis Police Department training manual, obtained by The Daily Beast, the maneuver is explained in detail and is said to be used on suspects that are resisting arrest. 

  • According to the motion filed Wednesday, Lane's lawyer said he was acting in accordance with the Minneapolis Police training manual at the time of Floyd's death.

  • Chauvin has been charged with second-degree murder, while Lane and fellow former officers Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J. Alexander Kueng, were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

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The Minneapolis Police Department trained its officers to use the neck restraint that led to George Floyd's death, according to court documents.

Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was killed on May 25 following an arrest in which a white police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. The court documents, obtained by The Daily Beast on Wednesday, were included in a Tuesday motion to dismiss charges against Thomas Lane, one of the three police officers that didn't intervene while then-officer Derek Chauvin was kneeling on Floyd's neck.

In the Minneapolis Police Department training manual, obtained by The Daily Beast, the maneuver is said to be used on suspects that are resisting arrest. The manual details the department's authorized use of force techniques and the differences between neck restraints and chokeholds.

A chokehold, the manual states, is a "deadly force option," which the police department defines as "applying direct pressure on a person's trachea or airway." A neck restraint is a "non-deadly force option" defined as "compressing one or both sides of a person's neck with an arm or leg, without applying direct pressure to the trachea or airway." 

The training manual, issued to all new officers, also features an image of how to execute the neck restraint. "Ok they are in handcuffs now what," the title above the image states. The department warns that "sudden cardiac arrest typically occurs immediately following a violent struggle." It also advises officers to "place the subject in the recovery position to alleviate positional asphyxia" and encourages officers to call emergency services once the suspect is in handcuffs.  

 

According to the motion filed by Lane's attorney on Tuesday, Lane was acting in accordance with the Minneapolis Police training manual at the time of Floyd's death. The 37-year-old, who started his law-enforcement career in December, was on his fourth full-time shift as a police officer at the time of the incident. 

"Lane knew Floyd needed to be restrained and he knew Chauvin was authorized to use reasonable force to restrain," the motion states. 

Chauvin has been charged with second-degree murder, while Lane and fellow former officers Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J. Alexander Kueng, were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

Lane last month was released on $750,000 bail.

An autopsy on Floyd conducted by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office last month concluded that Floyd "became unresponsive while being restrained by law enforcement officers" and died as a result of "cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdual, restraint, and neck compression." 

A second, independent autopsy commissioned by Floyd's family found that "the evidence is consistent with mechanical asphyxia as the cause of death and homicide as the manner of death."

In a criminal complaint filed in May, prosecutors said Floyd was killed by "the combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by the police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death." 

Floyd's death has sparked widespread protests across the US calling for police reform. On June 5, Minneapolis banned police from using chokeholds and neck restraints in response to Floyd's killing.

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