Meghan Markle Is Reportedly ‘Desperate’ To Be Friends With Taylor Swift, According To A Royal Author: ‘She Wants To Be Her’

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Meghan Markle‘s recent Sussex “rebranding” with her husband Prince Harry has garnered much attention, as they unveiled a new website and adopted the surname for their two children.

A royal commentator has also recently alleged that the Duchess, 42, has a strong desire to form a friendship with Taylor Swift, using the term “desperate” to describe her eagerness.

 

 

 

 

Is Meghan Markle 'Desperate' To Be Friends With Taylor Swift? A Royal Commentator Says So

Despite being personally invited by the Duchess, Swift, 34, never appeared on Markle's podcast, Archetypes, as reported by the Hinduistan Times. This was apparently a goal of Markle's.

However, even after the aforementioned snub, Markle has persisted in her pursuit of a friendship with the renowned Grammy winner, according to royal expert Kinsey Schofield who spoke with Express.

As the expert dished to GBN America's Patrick Christys: "Meghan attended the Taylor Swift concert in Los Angeles, but she made sure that People Magazine knew she attended." Schofield went on: "It was important for Meghan to release to gossip sites here that she was there, she wanted people to know."

Schofield posited her thoughts on the Suits star's desire for friendship with the "Anti-Hero" singer. "I think she wants to be like Taylor Swift marketing-wise," Schofield explained.

She continued: "Almost all the shows of her ongoing Eras Tour have been completely sold out. This speaks volumes about Swift's popularity and ever-growing fanbase, which has long been referred to as 'Swifties.'"

The royal author then shared another reason why Markle might relate to Swift. "Taylor went from villain to hero," Schofield said, adding: "I’m sure Meghan is looking at that transition and thinking, 'How can I do something similar?'"