Meet The Mind Behind NYC's Yellow House Architects

“I love traditional architecture because it has proved, over and over again, that it works,” explains the Haitian-born architect Elizabeth Graziolo, who launched her own Manhattan-based practice, Yellow House Architects, last February. And she should know what works. After graduating from Cooper Union and spending a few formative years at Cicognani Kalla Architect, Graziolo clocked two decades at the AD100 firm Peter Pennoyer Architects, one of the city’s leading classicist voices, where she became a partner. Since going out on her own, she has been busy designing and overseeing a number of projects, among them a mid-rise tower on Madison Avenue, a town house on the Upper East Side, and a ground-up pavilion bar for a home in the Caribbean. Carrying a historicist torch into the present day, she aims to design in a style that is “traditional, with a modern touch.” Case in point: an apartment in the newly refreshed Woolworth Tower Residences, where she plans to update some of Cass Gilbert’s details—adapting the original medallions for the dining-room ceiling and translating façade molding inside. (She is pictured on a terrace at the iconic 1913 building.) As Graziolo reflects, traditionalism is wide-ranging, taking inspiration from everything from Moroccan riads to Japanese teahouses. “It’s all about learning,” she says. “Every project is an opportunity to learn something new.” yellowhousearchitects.com 

Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest