McCormick & Company Recalls Three Of Their Major Seasonings After Possible Salmonella Contamination

·2 min read
McCormick & Co. Food Products Ahead Of Earnings Figures
McCormick & Co. Food Products Ahead Of Earnings Figures

Source: Bloomberg / Getty

McCormick & Company has announced a major recall of three of their seasonings that could be potentially linked to salmonella contamination.

The Food and Drug Administration revealed that McCormick’s Perfect Pinch Italian Seasoning, McCormick Culinary Italian Seasoning, and Frank’s RedHot Buffalo Ranch Seasoning are among the products that have been compromised.

Luckily no illnesses have been reported as of yet, the FDA stated.

A collective sigh can be heard amongst the Black community today. Spice brands like McCormick and the ever so delicious Lawry’s seasonings have been a staple in black households for centuries.

While it’s difficult to trace when season salt and other herbs and spices made its way into Black cuisine, Charla Draper, Ebony’s former food editor in the ’80s wrote in an article that “the blend of herbs and spices in one jar gave African-American cooks the opportunity to buy one item containing several herbs and spices, thus being both convenient and economical.”

Our tastebuds are watering as we type!

Unfortunately, the affected products were sold in select Walmart, Target, and Kroger stores between June 20 and July 21. They were also shipped to 32 states including New York, Georgia, and Illinois.

“McCormick has alerted customers and grocery outlets to remove the product with the affected date codes from store shelves and distribution centers immediately, and to destroy this product in a manner that would prevent any further consumption,” the company shared in a statement.

Consumers who would like a replacement product or a full refund are encouraged to contact McCormick Consumer Affairs at 1-800-635-2867 on weekdays from 9:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET.

Additionally, be sure to contact your doctor if you are experiencing any symptoms of salmonella. Symptoms included fever, stomach cramps, and diarrhea that could occur six hours to six days after initial exposure to the bacteria, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.