May We All Have the Energy of Jason Sudeikis's Golden Globes Acceptance Speech

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Photo credit: NBC - Getty Images
Photo credit: NBC - Getty Images

From Esquire

About midway through the Golden Globes—which was, essentially, one sad, massive quilt of stitched-together Zoom breakout rooms—we turned to the five guys nominated for best actor in a musical or comedy series. Don Cheadle, Nicholas Hoult, Eugene Levy, Jason Sudeikis, and Ramy Youssef. One of them was not as tidied up as the others.

It was Sudeikis, who was up for the award thanks to his delightful, earnest performance as a football-coach-out-of-water in Ted Lasso. Tie-dye hoodie, unshaven, admirably Zoom chic. Maybe even a little high. Probably lagged too, with a five-hour time difference overseas, where he's filming the next season of Ted Lasso. Then he won. In what others have called a "stuttering, rambling" speech, Sudeikis says "that's nuts" a few times while he gets his bearings. Doesn't look like he prepared anything. Then? He says something beautiful.

"I read this book to my son, Otis, called The Three Questions by Leo Tolstoy and he has three questions like, 'When's the best time to do things? What is the right thing to do? And then who's the most important one?' And that last question, who's the most important one, is the person you're with. So, I kind of reject the premise of being best actor because in my humble opinion, the best actor is the person you're acting with, so I want to give a shout-out to all the people I get to act with on this show."

During a night stuffed with bad joke, expensive clothes, and mostly-arbitrary awards, Sudeikis, might've said the only thing worth taking away from the three-hour-long charade. After nearly a year of hell, what else can we do besides look at the person we're next to—if we're even lucky enough to have that person—and just be happy that they're there?

Sure, there were people online pointing out Sudeikis's bleary eyes. But also just as many seemed to recognize the meaning behind his words—a gentle reminder to tell the people you love, that you love them.

Photo credit: Mike Kim
Photo credit: Mike Kim

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