This luxury outdoor dining experience is back at this famous Homestead farm

Luxury farm-to-table dining is returning to Paradise.

Paradise Farms in Homestead, a farm that supplies many local restaurants with produce and more, is re-launching its luxurious Dinners in Paradise dining series this Sunday, reviving an upscale dining experience that has been missing from Miami-Dade for almost 10 years.

The series, created by former Paradise Farms owner Gabriele Marewski, is now directed by entrepreneur Karla Dascal of The Sacred Space in Miami, who says she hopes to carry on Marewski’s dream of celebrating top chefs, farm-to-table meals and organically grown local produce.

“Gabriele planted the seeds,” says Dascal, who also operated the vegetarian restaurant Plant Miami, which closed in 2022. “She was the first to create farm-to-table experiences like this in Miami. Now we’re gearing up to introduce a different farm-to-table experience, whether it’s sustainable seafood-forward or vegan or just the best of the best in South Florida.”

But when Dascal says “local” she doesn’t mean only in Miami-Dade (though plenty of Miami-Dade produce will find its way to the table). The dinners will source ingredients from all over Florida, highlighting sustainable and organic practices.

Karla Dascal of The Sacred Space is rebooting the Dinner in Paradise series at Paradise Farms in Homestead.
Karla Dascal of The Sacred Space is rebooting the Dinner in Paradise series at Paradise Farms in Homestead.

Previous dinners included such chefs as Michael Schwartz of Michael’s Genuine and Giorgio Rapicavoli of Eating House. The reboot of the series kicks off not with a vegan or vegetarian meal, as it had in the past, but with a five-course, seafood-forward meal from Chefs Evan Burgess and Osmel Gonzalez of EntreNos, a tiny restaurant in Miami Shores dedicated to sourcing as much of its menu as possible from Florida. Though it only opened in 2023, the restaurant — which uses the space at Tinta y Cafe at night — was added to the Michelin Guide earlier this year.

“They’re very well versed in farm to table and sustainability,” Dascal says. “Back then, Gabriele chose those types of chefs, the ones who wanted to source the best produce and form that relationship with local farmers.”

Burgess said that their restaurant’s philosophy is a perfect fit with what Paradise Farms is trying to achieve.

“I think it’s about community, in the sense of really supporting everyone,” he says. “So many farmers have been gracious to us and supported our business, we want to support them. The only way to ensure the good guys stay there in Homestead is to support them. . . . it’s the same with fishermen. If you don’t support local fishermen you see truckloads of spiny lobster going to China. Not that China shouldn’t get our products, but we want to make sure a lot of that stuff stays here.”

Gonzalez agrees.

Evan Burgess and Osmel Gonzalez, the chefs for the first Paradise Farms new dinner series, at their restaurant EntreNos in Miami Shores Pedro Portal/pportal@miamiherald.com
Evan Burgess and Osmel Gonzalez, the chefs for the first Paradise Farms new dinner series, at their restaurant EntreNos in Miami Shores Pedro Portal/pportal@miamiherald.com

“We should be conscious of where food is coming from,” he says. “That’s a goal for us, to show people around us that Florida seafood is great. Why bring it in from other countries? And there’s not just snapper and grouper — there are a lot more fish that are wonderful.”

Sunday’s dinner will also include wine pairings; a tour of Paradise farms and a Q and A session with the farmers and the chefs. A percentage of the proceeds will benefit the nonprofit Paradise Foundation, which is dedicated to providing educational opportunities through agriculture, aspiring growers, chefs, culinary arts and cultivating local community engagement. The foundation is built on the regenerative farming movement, which includes practices to battle climate change by rebuilding soil organic matter and restoring soil biodiversity.

Because Florida’s growing season ends in May, the next dinner won’t be scheduled until fall. Dascal hopes to schedule five or six of the dinners a season, and believes the strong interest diners have in knowing where their food is coming from will fuel interest in the events.

“It’s going to be imperative for every chef to support their local farmers, because that’s what people want,” she says. “People want to know what they’re eating. There’s a lot of work to be done, and all that comes with awareness and education.”

The tranquil event space at Paradise Farms, which also hosts private and public tours.
The tranquil event space at Paradise Farms, which also hosts private and public tours.

Dinners in Paradise

Where: Paradise Farms, 19801 SW 320th St., Homestead

When: 4-7 p.m. Sunday, April 7

Cost: $345

Reservations: Eventbrite

More information: paradisefarms.com

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