L.A. Brand Camp High Is Riding High With New Store, Collaboration With Jordan Clarkson

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If Grateful Dead cofounder Jerry Garcia were still alive, he would be shopping at Camp High, the Los Angeles brand riding high on all things psychedelic.

At the new Camp High store in the Pacific Palisades, the array of tie-dye clothing would make any Dead Head proud, and the breadth of tie-dye joggers, sweatpants, sweatshirts, shorts, cable-knit pants, T-shirts and lid hats is proof that, at least in L.A., the trend is not going anywhere.

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Burton Snowboards veterans Greg Dacyshyn started Camp High in 2018, but didn’t open his first store until late last year and things are taking off. “The ethos of Camp High is living your best life and living your highest self,” Greg said.

One of Camp High’s fans is Utah Jazz basketball player Jordan Clarkson, a notable NBA fashion icon. (He was seen last year wearing a kilt by Fear of God.)

Around the same time, Jordan was spotted wearing various Camp High outfits, including a Camp High tie-dye robe sweatsuit and other Camp High clothing, which further enhanced the brand’s following.

The 6-foot, 4-inch basketball player discovered Camp High’s clothing at Maxfield, the luxury clothing purveyor with outposts in West Hollywood and Malibu.

Clarkson started buying more looks from Camp High, which were shown on LeagueFits, an Instagram-style account that puts basketball fashion into the spotlight.

Jordan Clarkson, next to Greg Dacyshyn, wearing an early prototype of the retro basketball jersey. - Credit: Courtesy
Jordan Clarkson, next to Greg Dacyshyn, wearing an early prototype of the retro basketball jersey. - Credit: Courtesy

Courtesy

Now Camp High is working with Clarkson and his 78 Studios brand to develop a retro-style button-up shooters jersey and matching short. It is a Camp High x 78 Studios project co-created by Clarkson and Greg Dacyshyn with the jersey retailing for $1,650 and the short for $1,250. It will soon be on the racks at Maxfield.

The throwback set is a lightweight knit whose yarns are made from recycled soda bottles and recycled scrap cotton. All the yarns are spun in L.A., and every piece, including the trims, are hand loomed.

More looks will follow. “We’re going to sit down with him because he’s in the basketball off season for a little bit. We’ll put his spin and idea about color on it and go from there,” Greg said.

Another Camp High fan is musician John Mayer of Dead & Company, the band started with former Grateful Dead musicians. The musician liked the retro Dead-Head style clothing so much he is now a partner in the venture, Greg said.

Camp High is carried at a variety of stores and websites around the world, including Jinji in Paris, Browns in London, Slam Jam in Italy, Union Los Angeles, Market in Miami, Mr Porter and Revive.

But the heart of the brand is in the 1,000-square-foot space on pedestrian-heavy Sunset Boulevard where the collection changes weekly and the décor is definitely fun. There’s a pinball machine on the store floor and lots of bright colors.

When it comes to clothing, high-end fabrics and details are paramount for Camp High. Most of the yarn and fabric comes from Italy and Japan. But, almost everything is made in locally, including the sweaters and knit pants manufactured by PDR Knitting, a hand-loom knitting company that caters to high-end labels.

Quality imported materials and artisanal production is why Camp High’s ice-dyed Zen cord pants go for $270. An ice-dyed waffle hoodie fetches $210, and tie-dyed lounge pants made of French terry are priced at $170.

Camp High in Pacific Palisades. - Credit: Courtesy
Camp High in Pacific Palisades. - Credit: Courtesy

Courtesy

“I think the people who buy our stuff have an appreciation for good design and good quality,” Greg said. “We take pride in our fabrics.”

Prior to launching Camp High, Greg and his wife, Anne-Marie Dacyshyn, worked for decades at Burton Snowboards in Burlington, Vermont. When Greg left in 2017, he had been the brand’s creative director for years and was known as one of snowboarding’s more colorful characters. Anne-Marie was Burton’s first chief marketing officer. She went on to become until recently president and chief marketing officer for Dosist, whose products include dose-controlled cannabis pens.

After leaving Burton, the Dacyshyns moved to the L.A. area and started the next chapters in their careers. “I wanted to do something that was soft clothing, comfortable things that you could put on in the morning, pass out in and wake up and do it all over again,” said Greg, who hasn’t worn closed-toed shoes in years.

The pandemic nudged that idea along as people adopted pajamas and lounge wear.

Now Anne-Marie is launching Camp High Collective, an agency she leads as its president. “We’re offering brand marketing services to other companies,” she said. “We know how to make brands that really resonate.”

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