Kid Cudi Wore a Dress on 'SNL' Last Night in a Tribute to Kurt Cobain

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Philip Ellis
·3 min read
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Photo credit: SNL - YouTube
Photo credit: SNL - YouTube

Singer and rapper Kid Cudi was last night's musical guest on Saturday Night Live, and he made his performance of new song 'Sad People' all the more memorable by taking to the stage in a dress.

It was a moment that many viewers have interpreted as an homage to the late rock musician Kurt Cobain. During his first appearance, in which he performed 'Tequila Shots', Cudi wore a green cardigan over a shirt and T-shirt bearing the image of former SNL star Chris Farley, who died in 1997. The green cardigan, shirt and white tee was an outfit famously worn by the Nirvana frontman during the now-iconic MTV Unplugged concert. The the floral print of Cudi's dress has also been pointed out as being similar in design to that of one also worn by Cobain.

After singing 'Sad People' on an empty stage with no backing vocalists, Cudi ended the song with a shy-looking curtsey—and social media was soon flooded with messages of support from fans applauding his performance, and his tribute to Cobain on the week that marked the 27th anniversary of his death. He has also been praised for shining a light on addiction and depression, issues which affected both Cobain and Farley.

Cudi has spoken publicly about his own struggles with mental illness in the past, and explored his journey with depression in his collaborative album with Kanye West, 2018's Kids See Ghosts (which he made, coincidentally, around the same time as his last SNL appearance). On the track 'Reborn', he sang about his feelings of worthlessness, and how peace can only come from within.

Now, with 'Sad People', it looks like Cudi is continuing his mission to break the stigma an silence that continue to surround the topic of mental health—and doing so in a highly visible, unforgettable way.

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Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men's Health

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