Hear Charles Hudson explain how to sell an idea (without a product) at Early Stage

Matt Burns

Startups often dance between selling dreams and building products, and we’ve enlisted the help of noted investor Charles Hudson to help founders sell an idea before they've built a product. Hudson is speaking at TechCrunch’s inaugural virtual event, TechCrunch Early Stage. The two-day event runs July 21 and 22 and will feature sessions targeting all aspects of building a startup.

Hudson has seen a lot of startups over his career as an investor and knows what it takes to sell an idea when there isn’t yet a product. As he’ll explain, this is often a tough skill to learn, and it takes practice to craft the correct message that shows obtainable goals while putting the investor at ease.

Charles Hudson is a managing partner at Precursor Ventures, where he focuses on pre-seed investments in companies building B2B and B2C software applications. Before this role, he was an investor at Uncork Capital (formerly SoftTech VC) and In-Q-Tel, the VC arm of the U.S.’s Central Intelligence Agency. Along the way, he’s held various executive and board positions at startups and organizations.

Hudson’s session at TC Early Stage is a must-watch for early-stage founders. Startups begin as an idea, and often that idea needs funds to turn into a product. Hudson will help show founders how to get an investor to buy into the concept before the product is built.

TC Early Stage takes place over two days in July and features 50+ experts across startup core competencies, such as fundraising, operations and marketing. The virtual event features some of the best operators, investors and founders in the startup world. Hear from Ann Miura-Ko on how to find a product-market fit. Ali Partovi is set to talk about how to hire early engineers, and Caryn Marooney’s session will explore how to make your brand stand out.

What’s more, most of the speakers, who happen to be investors, are participating in TechCrunch’s CrunchMatch, our program that connects founders to investors based on shared interests.

Here’s the fine print. Each of the 50+ breakout sessions is limited to around 100 attendees. We expect a lot more attendees, of course, so signups for each session are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Buy your ticket today, and you can sign up for the breakouts we are announcing today, as well as those already published. Pass holders will also receive 24-hour advance notice before we announce the next batch. (And yes, you can “drop” a breakout session in favor of a new one, in the event there is a schedule conflict.) 

Get your TC Early Stage pass today and jump into the inside track on the sessions we announced today, as well as the ones to be published in the coming days.

Possible sponsor? Hit us up right here.

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