Fall 2024 Accessories: Highlights From Paris Fashion Week

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PARIS — “Wearable doesn’t have to be boring,” Dries Van Noten told WWD during a preview of his fall 2024 collection, dismissing in a Belgian stroke the conservative minimalist moment that’s dominated fashion for a while.

With one of the standout shows of Paris Fashion Week, Van Noten expressed a sentiment that resonated with many fellow designers, who in their own ways looked to elevate and turn the ordinary into the extraordinary via a heightened focus on craftsmanship and eccentric outbursts, pushing a way of dressing that could be approachable but still eclectic and fun.

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Backstage at Dries Van Noten Backstage Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week
Backstage at Dries Van Noten Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week.

Jonathan Anderson’s latest collection for Loewe fell into that category, too, including in the accessories of boots, pumps and the brand’s Squeeze leather bag all densely beaded with florals or vegetable motifs. Cue the couture asparagus bag that won Instagram over and instantly created a new, unexpected desire among fashion followers.

Backstage at Victoria Beckham Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week
Backstage at Victoria Beckham Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week.

Elsewhere, bags came in maxi proportions that targeted everyday use, such as the office-ready styles at Victoria Beckham or the capacious ones at Acne Studios, Balenciaga and Alexander McQueen. Chemena Kamali’s winning debut at Chloé also had gargantuan hobo styles to match the ‘70s vibe of her collection, while Van Noten opted for similar proportions but in furry textures to add an unpredictable twist to his looks.

Yet a new frontier of craftsmanship was set by Coperni, where this season the signature Swipe bag was developed by Prof. Ioannis Michaloudis using a nanomaterial called silica aerogel, which has been used by NASA to capture stardust. The material resulted in a 33-gram design made from 99 percent air and 1 percent glass.

Backstage at Chloé Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week
Backstage at Chloé Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear collection at Paris Fashion Week.

In shoe land, boots ran the gamut from flashy, over-the-knee styles to flat combat and biker alternatives favored by fashion designers to ground their collections in both comfort and a tough attitude.

The former category ranged from Rick Owens‘ charming take on apocalyptic otherworldly fashion with sculptural, Toblerone-like boots to the impressive thigh-high ones Chitose Abe created to anchor the Sacai fall 2024 collection. These were deceptively disguised as sartorial pants and tuxedo trouser legs that stood on their own.

Rick Owens Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week
Rick Owens Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week

In keeping with the turbulent global environment, some designers offered alternatives aimed to empower women with a dash of anarchy and a rebellious undercurrent. Take Pierpaolo Piccioli’s all-black collection at Valentino: “It’s the color of these times,” said the Italian designer, who paraded feminine black looks with matching chunky biker boots. At Hermès, creative director Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski opted for an uber-elegant (and currently omnipresent) oxblood shade for a collection inspired by riding — both horses and motorbikes — that came with new must-have equestrian boots that unzipped to transform into looser biker styles.

“This collection is about my present state of mind. I have anger against everything in the world, especially against myself,” said Rei Kawakubo about her Comme des Garçons lineup. Mostly all black, looks came with matching derby styles developed in collaboration with Paris-based footwear brand Phileo that had oversize soles, which amplified models’ walks — and occasional angry stomps.

Backstage at Hermes Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week
Backstage at Hermes Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week

A vibrant energy resonated in a more playful way in reinterpretations of ‘60s styles. Part of the overarching ladylike trend that dominated London and Milan fashion weeks, the vibe shifted toward a more graphic and groovier direction in Paris — with footwear switching from pointy toes and kitten heels to squared shapes and chunkier low heels, as well as mary janes and geometric ankle boots. The Dior fall 2024 collection designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri offered plenty of appealing solutions. These added to the girly flat styles seen at Giambattista Valli and pointy mary janes at the Miu Miu show, where Miuccia Prada managed to turn the mundane leather hotel slipper into the ultimate go-to shoe.

Backstage at Dior Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week
Backstage at Dior Fall 2024 Ready-to-Wear Collection at Paris Fashion Week

All these trends infiltrated the presentations and showrooms of both established brands and indie labels that further filled the city’s packed fashion calendar, as seen, for example, at Roger Vivier, where creative director Gherardo Felloni embraced low heels, squared toes and all things optical, reinterpreting the brand founder’s most graphic designs from the ‘60s.

“Probably I arrived at this inspiration now because I feel that we need elegant and beautiful things. Not just sneakers or masculine shoes. So this kind of proportion makes things comfortable but glamorous at the same time,” he said about the way he revisited the famed Belle Vivier shoes and its hallmark metal buckle via striking stripes and chunky kitten heels in mismatched colors.

The new, graphic take on the Belle Vivier style from the Roger Vivier fall 2024 presentation in Paris.
The new, graphic take on the Belle Vivier style from the Roger Vivier fall 2024 presentation in Paris.

Here, WWD rounds up some of the highlights from accessories presentations.

Shoes: ‘60s Reload and Statement Boots

Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin hosted the fifth edition of “The Loubi Show” in Paris, which displayed the designer’s latest collection flanked by a performance by French artistic director Leo Walk and his dance company “La Marche Bleue.”

The high-heel maestro included in the range lower heights in ‘60s-nodding styles, such as flats in between a ballerina and a mary jane that were punctuated by crystals, as well as the new Minny pump that features a chunky inflated-like heel and squared toe cap. The latter came in different renditions, encompassing metallic slingbacks or garish alternatives covered with floral appliqués.

The Minny style by Christian Louboutin.
The Minny style by Christian Louboutin.

The intricate embellishments continued in a series of statement cowboy boots, including a limited-edition version of the Santigag Strass style available in black or tan that featured hand-stitched metallic embroideries, glass bead needlework as well as 3D crystals, requiring up to 220 hours of work per pair.

Aeyde

The ‘60s vibe resonated also with the ever-present Bauhaus inspirations that underpin Aeyde’s aesthetic and its founder Luisa Dames’ goal of serving modern women on the move. The Berlin-based label presented an array of styles ranging from sleek cowboy and biker boots to pointy kitten-heeled designs. But it was the Cleo flat mary jane style that stood out as an unfussy, everyday solution with its classic silhouettes crafted in supple calf leather. For those looking for a twist on the theme, Dames’ reference to the Brutalist design movement and its flaunting of rough simplicity was translated into a caged version of the Uma square-toed mary janes.

The Uma style by Aeyde.
The Uma style by Aeyde.

Pierre Hardy

Never one to work with unnecessary bells and whistles on his footwear, Pierre Hardy hinged the fall 2024 collection on seven pillar styles intended to create a streamlined and timeless shoe wardrobe. The designs he selected ranged from Chelsea and desert boots to graphic loafers and their mule versions. But the standout was the Rider style, a hybrid in between these two ends of the spectrum. Available in black or camel shades, the design oozed a tomboyish vibe and came with a double-ring strap on the front that elevated its clean shape.

The Rider style by Pierre Hardy.
The Rider style by Pierre Hardy.

13 09 SR

A buckle galore also marked plenty of the boots in the latest collection of 13 09 SR, the brand Serge Ruffieux launched with Emilie Faure in 2021 and that stands apart by offering comfort and functionality in an eccentric way. Most associated with the pointy flats crafted from deadstock fabrics and leathers, ribbons and crystals, python and croco effects, this season the label made a big push with hard-to-miss boots. Cue the Bootsy design in crackled leather cinched with straps and buckles, covered in studs and featuring the brand’s signature Egg heel.

The Bootsy style by 13 09 SR.
The Bootsy style by 13 09 SR.

The label’s ever-expanding assortment will soon see the addition of a special tie-up, too, as 13 09 SR joined forces with Suicoke to revisit one of the Japanese brand’s signature styles, following in the footsteps of the likes of Missoni, Moncler, Lanvin, Blumarine, Carhartt WIP and Dr. Martens, among others.

Cazabat 

French shoe designer Jean-Michel Cazabat is back. After spending more than 30 years in New York, working with top fashion houses and launching his eponymous brand in 2000, the French shoe designer moved back to his homeland and launched the Cazabat brand with a higher positioning.

“After COVID-19 I felt the need to take a break, revamp myself and go back to my roots,” he said about seeking temporary refuge in the Pyrenees mountains “where my mother is from.”

The hiatus inspired the designer to make a comeback “to create something more artisanal,” further upping the ante in craftsmanship while delivering comfort with a sexy twist and his signature rock attitude.

Boots by Cazabat.
Boots by Cazabat.

The expansive collection Cazabat debuted in his showroom with an impressive view over Jardin des Tuileries ranged from biker and combat boots to mid-heeled slingbacks with feathers or silk organza embellishments and metallic sandals that could still resonate with the celebrities that have worn his designs for years. Couture-like creations included mules made from vintage denim pants that were turned into a furry texture with added threads of real gold. The made-to-order styles, which took 30 hours to make, were flanked by other designs in exotic prints, laminated effects and crystal embellishments.

The collection is set to hit the market in June, when the brand’s e-commerce platform will launch and the range will be available at a selection of high-end multibrand retailers, as Cazabat noted that “today we’re more couture and we don’t need to be everywhere.”

Laurence Dacade

At Laurence Dacade, a game of contrast turned biker boots, chunky heeled moccasins and pointy ballerina flats into eye-catching pieces, as the strong leather silhouettes were covered in delicate floral prints. These were complemented by the same styles in monochrome versions, ranging from black patent leather renditions to camel suede ones, as well as designs in crackled gold leather oozing a more rock-‘n’-roll attitude. This season, Dacade “accessorized” her shoe collection with matching garments in one-size-fits-all shapes, ranging from leather vests to baggy pants and roomy Bermuda pants.

“I thought it was so much fun to have something linked to the shoes,” she said, remembering how she first started her career designing clothes before turning her focus to footwear. “But clothes were work, shoes are a passion,” she said with a smile.

Boots by Laurence Dacade.
Boots by Laurence Dacade.

Adieu

Adieu’s founders Isabelle Guédon and Benjamin Caron continued to explore new renditions of their creeper styles and experiment with flashy color combinations. Since launching the Parisian brand in 2012, the duo has become an authority in the category with their high-end take on teddy boys-style loafers, derbies and brogue designs featuring 3D rubber soles. For fall 2024 they also applied their sophisticated taste and color schemes to chunky boots, delivering a mix of edge, refinement and quality in tough-looking designs.

Boots by Adieu.
Boots by Adieu.

Bags: Go Big or Go Crafty

Delvaux

Delvaux continued to leverage striking art installations to elevate its presentations. This time the brand pushed the creative envelope by transporting part of the Arsenal — its Brussels headquarters and atelier — to Paris. The live showcase of its artisans at work was intended to spotlight the leather-making craftsmanship and hand-painting artistry that are at the core of the company since its establishment in 1829 and restate the label’s expertise in luxury bags (Delvaux filed the first-ever leather handbag patent in the world in 1908).

Delvaux’s chief executive officer Jean-Marc Loubier took pride in listing the number of talents the brand involved in the arty presentation, ranging from Van der Kelen, the oldest remaining school devoted exclusively to the technique of hand-painted trompe l’oeil that temporarily decorated the location’s walls to Jack Flanagan’s set design and gallerist Patrick Fourtin, who provided the stunning artworks in the very important customer-reserved room.

The Airess bag by Delvaux.
The Airess bag by Delvaux.

The most impressive installations highlighted the Airess and Caprice bags. The former style nodded to Delvaux’s pioneering Avia Airess suitcase that traces back to 1946, which introduced a revolution in weightless travel design with its proprietary hole-punched aluminum interior. Such a structure was reimagined in a trapezoidal shopping bag crafted from soft Taurillon leather.

First rediscovered in Elizabeth Taylor’s personal collection, the Caprice mini handbag best proved Delvaux’s artisanship. Each arranged on a pedestal, 70 black calf leather versions of the style surrounded a single row of 15 limited-edition renditions that could easily double as art pieces, since they were crafted from materials such as malachite, ebony, glass, springbok, hammered steel, crystal and ceramic, to name a few.

Limited-edition Caprice bags by Delvaux.
Limited-edition Caprice bags by Delvaux.

Joseph Duclos

Artisans at work were also the focal point of Joseph Duclos’ in-store presentation. “It’s all about the story of handmade [crafts], which I will never let go. If we stop doing the craft, we will have fewer artisans and fewer leather-makers, too,” said Ramesh Nair who, after making a name for himself at Hermès, Jean Paul Gaultier and Moynat, has been tasked to creatively lead the company.

The brand, which recently raised 7 million euros in funding from French entrepreneurs and family offices, was launched in 2021 to celebrate the legacy of entrepreneur Joseph Duclos, who in the 18th century combined three small tanneries in Lectoure, France, and earned the title of Royal Leather Manufacture by King Louis XV in 1754. Under Nair’s guidance, it has gradually expanded its range with new takes on its pillar styles. For example, for fall 2024 the Saint-Clair collection saw the addition of a small-sized handbag pairing hard leather with an ultra-soft nubuck flap, while the Diane bag was reinterpreted in both mini and maxi versions. The mini ones were especially striking as they came in “Tempo” full grain calf leather with a vintage feeling as well as in exotic lizard in popping colors and shiny or matte finishes.

The Diane L15 bag by Joseph Duclos.
The Diane L15 bag by Joseph Duclos.

Létrange

Borderline art piece, the Empreinte bag by Létrange already counts among its clients the likes of Charlene of Monaco. Its minimal structure in calfskin, goatskin or exotic leather is enriched with a sculptural handle, in a concept that took the brand’s artistic director Mathias Jaquemet three years to develop.

Chairman and seventh-generation family member Sébastien Létrange tasked Jacquemet — who is also head designer of Louis Vuitton men’s leather goods — to revamp the French heritage brand by combining centuries-old craftsmanship with innovation and experimentation. Following the motto “Heritage with a twist,” Jacquemet developed different styles, including the Égo bag inspired by Japanese origami and also available in exclusive styles hand-embroidered with colorful beads or with hand-painted panthers on it.

The Empreinte bag by Létrange.
The Empreinte bag by Létrange.

Other customizations of the bag are offered in the personalization bar installed at L’Appartement Létrange, the 4,500-square-foot retail concept the brand recently opened on Rue Saint-Honoré and where it takes private appointments with its customers and press.

Published By

Austria-based brand Published By introduced its first maxi tote bag and shopping bag, stretching its avant-garde and sculptural aesthetic to more daily items. Established in 2020 by Christoph Tsetinis and Ruby Wallen, the label has rapidly made a name for itself for its gender-neutral and chromed pieces realized through processes borrowed from the automotive industry rather than fashion. In particular, Tsetinis relies on waste-free, 3D design to experiment with creatively and optimize performance. This season, the focus was on functionality, as the signature clasps, chains and sculptural elements on the leather pieces were made of aluminum to reduce weight. The organic metallic shapes of the classic silhouettes of the tote bag were a nod to climbing gear from the ‘70s as the founders looked the outdoors for inspiration.

New bags from the Published By fall 2024 collection.
New bags from the Published By fall 2024 collection.

In keeping with the reference, the brand also unveiled its first venture in footwear in collaboration with Grounds, reimaging the Japanese shoe company’s signature “Jewelry” and “Moopie” styles with a textured 3D tech knit upper and the distinctive bubble soles in a sleek black finish. Both sneakers came with removable hiking gaiter made from a technical water-repellent fabric and fastened to the shoe via Published By’s aluminum hardware and black toggle-fastened ropes. The tie-up is a prelude to Published By’s big plans of product category expansion, from the launch of its own footwear line to the introduction of ready-to-wear for spring 2025.

Manu Atelier

Turkish accessory brand Manu Atelier is marking its 10th anniversary with a showroom in Rue Cambon and a new bag, aptly named “Le Cambon 35.” An evolution of the “Tote du Jour” capacious style that sisters Beste and Merve Manastır debuted last season, the minimal design embellished with a tiny metal buckle was crafted in grained leather or soft suede and rendered in classic shades such as black and vanilla, in addition to taupe and a standout chocolate color. Available in three sizes, it was particularly striking in the extra-large version, as the proportion turned it into a polished yet practical choice both for work and off-duty moments.

"Le Cambon 35" bag by Manu Atelier.
“Le Cambon 35” bag by Manu Atelier.

Dentro

Isa Kauffman’s ultimate goal is to celebrate the craftsmanship behind her bags — but in her unique and anarchic way. Ever since launching her brand Dentro in 2020, she does that by flipping handbags — and perspective — by showing what’s inside or supposed to be hidden, like foam padding, reverse handles, stitching and threads left uncut. For fall 2024, Kauffman introduced furry textures in beige and oxblood shades into her series of inventive, playful styles, adding to the existing designs in leather, paper, moire fabric or worked with metallics and cracked, lived-in effects that best express the rawness embedded in her brand’s DNA. A new and more polished handbag also made an appearance, with its roomy rectangular shape looking like a suede bag that’s been flipped inside out.

The Mini Otto bag by Dentro.
The Mini Otto bag by Dentro.

Lancel

Lancel hosted a cocktail party at its historic store across from the Paris Opera that also displayed its craftsmanship and celebrated the heritage of Angèle and Alphonse Lancel, who founded the label in 1876. The hero style of the evening was the Angèle bag, whose geometric silhouette crafted from smooth leather and sealed by the double L clasp was rendered in a pop version mimicking an envelope. A nod to the frequent correspondence between the founders, the reference was stretched into a traveling theme at the in-store event, which also spotlighted archive trunks flanked by Lancel’s new Neo-Partance suitcase and featured a workshop that enabled guests to discover how the brand’s leather key rings are made — and get a custom one on the spot.

The Angèle bag by Lancel.
The Angèle bag by Lancel.

Michino

As his brand hit its 10th anniversary, accessories designer Yasu Michino had an epiphany. “When I was in this numbers game of how many brands I could design for, how many bags I could sketch, Michino was a laboratory of self-expression and a place where I can do what I want,” he said. What he wants now is a clean slate, for him and the label. Exit quirky and colorful design, hello a small lineup of classic shapes with design twists. His recipe for success is realizing that “some customers are so used to the form-factor that they cannot be flexible about size, weight or the way it’s held,” the Paris-based designer said. The collection includes the Lutèce top-handle bag in a range of winter white-adjacent neutrals; the reversible Rivoli tote in black and dove gray or dark eclipse blue and gold colorways, and a newly introduced flap style called the Elysée, which features patent-pending invisible curved eyelets for its strap.

Styles from Michino.
Styles from Michino.

Bonus Accessories

Ruslan Baginskiy

When milliner Ruslan Baginskiy started working on his fall collection, the looming two-year anniversary of the full-scale war in Ukraine weighed heavily on his mind. “At first, my thought was to make an all-black collection because it reflected how I felt,” he said. But when the first samples came out, he realized that the moment called for a flurry of color. “Something that inspires life and gives a kick start to our days,” he added. Epitomizing that idea was a shaggy hat offered in royal purple, his baker boy cap in an overdyed orange and his newest development, a wide-brim foldable boater hat offered in wool for fall. The Ukrainian designer supplemented these with see-now, buy-now caps in velvet, fleece or terrycloth featuring the brand’s new monogram and pastel hues inspired by a sunny-day luncheon, which were already spotted on the fashion set during Paris shows.

Ruslan Baginskiy
Ruslan Baginskiy

Casetify

Since our devices are in-hand most of the time, they could be considered a base layer of an outfit, in the opinion of tech accessory brand Casetify. That’s why the brand is introducing the Essentials line, with its range of neutrals inspired by the tone-matching of shapewear brands.

Casetify
Casetify

Lily Templeton contributed reporting to this article.

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