Experts weigh in on why summer didn't kill the coronavirus

When the coronavirus pandemic hit the United States in March, White House officials’ hopes seemed high that summer would stem the tide of COVID-19. During an April 24 White House coronavirus task force briefing, William Bryan, the acting undersecretary for science and technology at the Department of Homeland Security, touted “emerging evidence” that reportedly showed SARS-CoV-2 would die more quickly in the presence of sunlight and humidity.Scientists were dubious that this would have a major effect, pointing to countries with already-warm weather that were then experiencing outbreaks. Now mid-July, with over 3.4 million U.S. cases and record-breaking daily cases in some of the warmest states, scientists are realizing their predictions were right — and are shining a light on what the officials may have missed.

Video Transcript

[MUSIC PLAYING]

More From

  • The mini-pantry movement is helping the hungry during the pandemic

    Since Jessica McClard's first "Little Free Pantry" in Arkansas, thousands of individuals have followed in her footsteps. About a third of these pantries have opened since the coronavirus pandemic began. Yahoo Life is joined by four founders of pantries across the country to share the ways in which mini pantry movement has affected their lives and their community.

  • Here are the best appliances to get that 'fresh home feeling'

    As the director of the Home Appliances & Cleaning Products Lab at the Good Housekeeping Institute, Carolyn Forte knows a thing or two about keeping a clean home. Not only does she oversee testing and research for cleaning appliances and products, she also shares tips and tricks in a monthly cleaning advice column called, "Ask the GH Cleaning Lab.” During these unprecedented times, a clean home can really make a difference on the health and well-being of you and your family. From vacuums and robot mops to air purifiers it can be difficult to know which products to choose, but in the video above, the “Queen of Clean” shares her top picks for cleaning appliances that are sure to deliver that fresh-home-feeling for years to come.

  • Rachael Ray and her husband are safe after fire at New York home

    Celebrity chef Rachael Ray and her husband John Cusimano are safe following a fire at their New York home this weekend.

  • Watching the Perseids Meteor Shower 2020: Astronomer says when and where to look

    Jackie Faherty, an Astronomer at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, gives Yahoo Life advice for watching the 2020 Perseids meteor shower on August 11th & 12th. First, find a dark open sky. “You want to have a huge swath of the sky that you can look at,” she says. She recommends finding an a field or a beach where there’s very little light pollution. Next she says, be aware of where the moon is. “The moon is like a lightbulb in the sky, and depending on its stage it can outshine the whole sky.” Lucky for us, the moon is in a later stage, so heading out when the sky is dark after sunset is best. Finally, be patient. “You need to be out there, I would say for a minimum of two hours,” Faherty says. “You need at least 15 minutes for your eyes to adjust and then you have to give nature a chance to inspire you.”