DeSean Jackson apologizes again for Hitler post, this time to Eagles brass, Jewish community leaders

DeSean Jackson has issued another apology after posting a fake Hitler quote on his Instagram page on Monday.

This time, the Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver personally apologized to Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie and general manager Howie Roseman, both of whom are Jewish. He also reportedly consulted with Rabbi Doniel Grodnitzky of Chabad Young Philly for education.

The report of the meeting and the personal apologies to Eagles executives preceded a public apology from Jackson, naming Lurie, Roseman and head coach Doug Pederson, on his Twitter page Tuesday evening.

In his Twitter apology, Jackson said his intent in sharing the quote that he thought came from Adolf Hitler was “to unite and encourage our culture with positivity and light.”

‘I unintentionally hurt the Jewish community’

“My intention was to uplift, unite and encourage our culture with positivity and light,” Jackson wrote after apologizing to Eagles management. “Unfortunately that did not happen. I unintentionally hurt the Jewish community in the process and for that I am sorry!”

Jackson then vowed to “educate myself” in an effort to “do better” and make “this world a better place for our children.”

The passage that caused the uproar referred to Black people as “the real children of Israel” and allegedly cited Hitler’s plan to incite World War III from his grave.

Hitler, of course, never said this. Snopes uncovered the passage as part of a clickbait campaign from 2017.

DeSean Jackson said his intent in sharing a quote that he thought came from Adolf Hitler was “to unite and encourage our culture with positivity and light.” (AP Photo/John Amis, File)
DeSean Jackson said his intent in sharing a quote that he thought came from Adolf Hitler was “to unite and encourage our culture with positivity and light.” (AP Photo/John Amis, File)

After his Tuesday evening apology, David Adelman, the chair of the Philadelphia Holocaust Memorial, wrote on Twitter that he had a FaceTime call with Jackson and expressed confidence that “we can turn this into a positive together.”

Jackson’s other apologies

Jackson also issued a video apology earlier Tuesday on his Instagram page.

“I want to extend an apology on the behalf of me and what I stand for,” Jackson said. “I never wanted to raise doubt or put any people down. My post was definitely not intended for anybody of any race to feel any type of way, especially the Jewish community. When I posted what I posted, I definitely didn’t mean it to the extent you guys took it.”

Jackson also made a brief apology on Instagram late Monday once his post started to gain traction.

“Anyone who feels I have hate toward the Jewish community took my post the wrong way,” Jackson wrote. “I have no hatred in my heart towards no one!! Equality Equality”

Jackson’s job in peril?

Jackson’s fate with the Eagles remains unclear. The Eagles issued a stern statement about Jackson’s post early Tuesday before either of his public apologies.

The implication of the Eagles’ message is clear. Jackson’s job is at stake. Whether he’s done enough to save it is yet to be determined.

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