CDC Chief Just Said This Keeps Her Up at Night

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While the country has seemingly turned the corner in terms of the COVID-19 pandemic, with infections, hospitalizations and deaths continuing to decline, the war against the deadly virus isn't over yet. On Wednesday, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), testified before Congress and revealed that there is one thing in particular she is still extremely concerned about—so much so that it keeps her up at night. Read on to find out what it is—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You Had COVID And Should Tell Your Doctor.

"We're Too Early to Declare Victory"

Dr. Walensky admitted that while the virus is somewhat controlled for now in the United States, things could turn around for the worst. "I think we would be remiss to say that we are out of the woods. This pandemic, this virus, has sent us too many curveballs," she said. "We're too early to declare victory."

She also pointed out that because the virus is still so widespread in other countries, there is a lot of potential for even more mutation. "Certainly with virus circulating in other parts of the world, that is a high degree, gives the opportunity for more variants to emerge," she continued. "It's among the things that keep me up at night."

However, for the time being, the three vaccines being administered seem to protect against the currently circulating variants. "Right now the variants that we see here, and we're doing a lot of sequencing, now demonstrates that our current vaccines are working," she revealed.

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COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage is Lower in Rural Counties

On Tuesday, during the White House COVID-19 Response Team Briefing, Dr. Walensky revealed that some areas of the country are less vaccinated than others, which is very concerning to her. "COVID-19 vaccination coverage was lower in rural counties—approximately 39 percent compared to urban counties, approximately 46 percent," she revealed. "This was true for counties across the country, across all age groups and among men and women."

So follow public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—wear a face mask that fits snugly and is double layered, don't travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don't go indoors with people you're not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, And to get through life at your healthiest, don't miss: This Supplement Can Raise Your Cancer Risk, Experts Say.