Canadian influencer claps back at comment that she's 'one Twinkie away from death'

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·3 min read
Alicia McCarvell. Photo via Instagram @aliciamccarvell
Alicia McCarvell is hitting back at body shamers yet again. Photo via Instagram @aliciamccarvell

Alicia McCarvell is hitting back at body shamers once again.

On Saturday, the Canadian influencer and TikTok star, known for her body-championing and self-love content, took to Instagram to share a video responding to a recent comment that she is "one Twinkie away from death."

"Worry about yourself. Thanks," she captioned a clip of herself eating a Twinkie in her underwear, with additional text in the video that reads: "This is my second. Not sure what I'm doing wrong... I guess I'll have a third."

Her clap back post was in reference to a recent comment she received on Instagram. In a separate post, she shared the comment along with a photo of herself.

"Your 'health crusade' against fat people isn't support, it isn't love, it isn't helpful," McCarvell, who is based in Halifax, wrote. "It is bullying. Stop it. You don't care about my health, you just don't like fat people."

Fans quickly met the influencer's post with praise and supportive messages, applauding her "unadulterated yet subtle" clap back and thanking her for being "such an inspiration."

"This is my favourite clap back ever," one Instagram user replied, while another wrote, You are such an inspiration. Keep being you and don’t ever, ever change."

"Yes! ignore the haters, you are awesome and beautiful and life is too short to listen to sad, angry people like that!" someone else shared.

One fan wrote: "This is the energy I strive for each day!"

"This is brilliant," commented another.

"It's the unadulterated yet subtle clap back for me," someone added.

In a recent interview, McCarvell opened up about feeling resilient to body shaming and having an empathetic — and evidently, lighthearted disposition toward ignorance.

“I’m in a very different spot than a lot of other fat people or a lot of other people who are struggling with their bodies, so I can see a comment and it not bother me, but that doesn’t mean I don’t have other fat people or people struggling with their body in my comment sections who won’t see that comment and struggle with it,” she told Yahoo Canada.

“I have to have a level of empathy and caring for the people who come into my space that are uneducated or don’t understand what I’m going through because I was taught all of the same things about being fat as a straight-sized person was,” she went on.

“I was taught that being fat was bad, I was taught that being fat made me not worthy ... So when somebody who is straight-sized and has been taught all of those things comes into my platform and sees me existing successfully as a fat woman and happily as a fat woman, I understand that that is a surprise to them, because it’s also a surprise to me."

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