California's confirmed coronavirus cases have topped 409,000, surpassing New York for most in the nation

More From

  • Virtual preparation allows Miss Nicaragua amid pandemic

    For four months, everything was virtual: the modeling and speech classes, the make-up courses and the emotional support session via videoconference. “We managed to organize the event under the pandemic with masks, social distancing and little money, (but) with talent and creativity,” said Karen Celebertti, who has been running the pageant for two decades in Nicaragua. On Saturday night, 23-year-old Ana Marcelo, an agroindustrial engineer from Estelí, was crowned Miss Nicaragua in front of a limited audience (two people per contestant spaced safely) plus a production crew of 85.

  • Native mascots still a sticking point in high school sports

    At a mostly white high school near Salt Lake City, the steps leading to the football field are covered in red handprints, arrows and drawings of Native American men in headdresses meant to represent the mascot, the Braves. While advocates have made strides in getting Native American symbols and names changed in sports, they say there's still work to do mainly at the high school level, where mascots like Braves, Indians, Warriors, Chiefs and Redskins persist. Momentum is building during a nationwide push for racial justice following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the NFL team in Washington dropping the Redskins name.

  • BBC says sorry for using racist term in news report

    The BBC included the word when reporting last month on a violent attack on a young Black man in Bristol, a city in southwest England. On Saturday, comedian and broadcaster Sideman quit music station BBC 1Xtra over the use of the word and the corporation’s failure to apologize. Director-general Tony Hall said in a memo to staff that the BBC’s intention “was to highlight an alleged racist attack.”

  • Black people in Portland struggle to be heard amid protests

    Chaotic and often violent protests against racial injustice have topped the headlines for days, but lost in the shouting are the voices of many Black Portland residents themselves — and their feelings about the unrest are nuanced and diverse. Others welcome white demonstrators because with their larger numbers they can draw attention to the city's racial inequity in ways that Black demonstrators alone can't. Others say a recent vote to cut a specialized gun violence reduction unit is behind a sharp spike in shootings that's devastated their community.