Bubba Wallace says the 'narrative' that NASCAR fans are racist is 'totally not true'

NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace appeared on Desus & Mero Thursday night, where host Desus Nice brought up how many people automatically think of the Confederate flag when they think of NASCAR. However, Wallace was quick to point out that the current narrative about the fans of the sport is false.

"We always want to pay attention to the negative, but the narrative that's been out there now is saying all NASCAR fans are racist, and whatnot, and that's totally not true," said Wallace. He added, "I've gone down in the fans, in the infield at Talladega, wherever it's at. Daytona, Texas, Michigan, and I never knew if people were flying the Confederate flag. We would go there and drink beer, have a good time and hang out. It wasn't like they don't want you there." 

Wallace also explained that when he suggested that NASCAR ban Confederate flags, which offended many people, he did so in order to attract more fans and to change up the face of the sport to allow it to be more diverse.

Finally, Wallace stated, "Why aren't there more sponsors? Maybe because the Confederate flag. Let's just get rid of it at NASCAR races. I'm not saying you have to get rid of it in your daily life. You know what I'm saying? You can wear that proudly at home, but when you come to a NASCAR race let's show that we're all welcoming. You may not carry any hate in your heart, and that's totally fine. I know not every person is bad, not every NASCAR fan is bad, but we have to show that, hey, we want other people to be a part of our sport as well."

Video Transcript

BUBBA WALLACE: We always want to pay attention to the negative, but the narrative that's been out there now is saying like all NASCAR fans are racist and whatnot. And that's totally not true.

- NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace dropped in to Desus and Mero, Thursday night, where host Desus Nice brought up how many people automatically think of the Confederate flag when they think of NASCAR. However, Wallace was quick to point out that the current narrative about the fans of the sport is false.

BUBBA WALLACE: I've gone down in the fans in the infield at Talladega, wherever it's at, at Daytona, Texas, Michigan, and I never knew if people were flying the Confederate flag. We would go down there and drink beer, have a good time, and hang out. So it wasn't like they don't want you there.

- Wallace also explained that when he suggested that NASCAR banned Confederate flags, which offended many people, he did so in order to attract more fans and to change up the face of the sport to allow it to be more diverse.

BUBBA WALLACE: Why isn't there more sponsors in it? Maybe because of the Confederate flag. Let's just get rid of it at NASCAR races. I'm not saying you have to get rid of it in your daily life. You know what I'm saying?

- Right.

BUBBA WALLACE: You can you can wear that proudly at home. But just when you come to a NASCAR race, let's show that we're all welcoming.

More From

  • 'Big Brother' experiences 'technical difficulties' during long-awaited Season 22 premiere

    Despite delaying production because of the coronavirus, mistakes were still made on the season premiere of "Big Brother."

  • Meghan McCain hates getting asked this question: 'No other host has to deal with this B.S.'

    "The View" host was not thrilled with one fan's question, which she feels she is asked "every 20 seconds."

  • Julie Chen-Moonves left apologizing after production gaffe on ‘Big Brother’ premiere

    Season 22 of Big Brother premiered Wednesday night, after being delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the show houseguests were made up of all-stars, production thought it would be fun to make the game even more challenging, starting with the rooms. However, production glitches marred the reveal of the very first room. Production took the current pandemic very seriously, as all the contestants were quarantined for 14 days and passed several tests for coronavirus. However, when it came time to separate the competitors they ran into trouble After competing to see who would be head of household and who would not, a group known as the “have-nots” were cast off to a new themed room. The room was supposed to be extremely uncomfortable to live in, however no one knows for sure because the room was locked. The room was supposed to be the big reveal at the end of the show. However, the glitch left host Julie Chen-Moonves hanging, as the contestant repeatedly tried to enter the room. “Just stay in the hall for seven days. I'm kidding. Well, as we work out our technical difficulties, I will say it's only going to be seven days you have to live in this room.” The gaffe did not go unnoticed, as many fans called out the mistake on Twitter.

  • Meghan McCain annoyed by fan's question: 'No other host has to deal with this B.S.'

    On Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen Wednesday night, Meghan McCain was not thrilled with a fan's question about whether or not she would be returning to her hosting job on The View after the birth of her first child. In fact, McCain even seemed a little annoyed as she quickly responded, "Why does everyone ask me if I'm getting fired or quitting every 20 seconds? No other host has to deal with this B.S. Yes, I'm coming back, it's an election cycle, like, yes." While McCain will have to temporarily leave the show for maternity leave, the host did take to Twitter on Tuesday to endorse former New York Times opinion editor Bari Weiss as a possible fill in for her. However, McCain assured viewers that she will be returning to the daytime talk show in time for the elections. As for whether or not she's voting for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, McCain stated, "I'm not saying who I'm voting for, but I'm not voting for Trump. But I really want to see who he chooses, and I want to see how this plays out, and I want to see the debates, and I'm, like, such a last-minute, I mean, I'm so spoiled because I loved so many elections and this one is not my favorite for a lot of different reasons."