British Vogue editor Edward Enninful says he was racially profiled by his own magazine's security guard

jsarkisian@businessinsider.com (Jacob Sarkisian)
Edward Enninful has been editor-in-chief of British Vogue since 2017.
Edward Enninful has been editor-in-chief of British Vogue since 2017.

David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for NETFLIX

  • British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful posted an Instagram saying he was racially profiled by a security guard on his way into work on Wednesday.

  • Enninful wrote: "I was instructed to use the loading bay. Just because our timelines and weekends are returning to normal, we cannot let the world return to how it was. Change needs to happen now."

  • Enninful said that "Condé Nast moved quickly to dismiss the security guard," but also wrote that: "It doesn't matter what you've achieved in the course of your life: the first thing that some people will judge you on is the colour of your skin."

  • Enninful has been the editor of British Vogue, which is owned by Condé Nast, since 2017 and received an OBE in 2016 for services to diversity within the fashion industry.

  • In a leaked email in June, Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour wrote that "it can't be easy to be a Black employee at Vogue."

Edward Enninful, the editor-in-chief of British Vogue, said he was racially profiled by a Condé Nast security guard on his way into work on Wednesday.

Late on Wednesday night, Enninful posted a slideshow of photos to his Instagram, which read: "Today, I was racially profiled by a security guard whilst entering my work place. I was instructed to use the loading bay. Just because our timelines and weekends are returning to normal, we cannot let the world return to how it was. Change needs to happen now."

Enninful was referencing the Black Lives Matter movement, which has been galvanized worldwide in the wake of George Floyd, an American black man who died after a police officer knelt on his neck for eight minutes.

In his caption for the post, Enninful added that "Condé Nast moved quickly to dismiss the security guard.

"But it just goes to show that sometimes it doesn't matter what you've achieved in the course of your life: the first thing that some people will judge you on is the colour of your skin."

 

Anna Wintour, Vogue editor-in-chief, said in a leaked email in June that "it can't be easy to be a Black employee at Vogue."

In the email, Wintour wrote that she took "full responsibility" for the any stories or images published by the magazine that have been "hurtful or intolerant."

Wintour wrote: "I know that it is not enough to say we will do better, but we will — and please know that I value your voices and responses as we move forward."

Meanwhile, Beverly Johnson, who was the first Black model to appear on the front cover of Vogue, wrote in an op-ed that Vogue has "not found enough ways to elevate and give space to Black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creators."

Johnson wrote: "My debut was meant to usher in a current of change in the fashion industry."

"But as the national conversation around racism expands, stories about discrimination in the fashion industry and at Vogue, in particular, have come under the spotlight."

Enninful has been the editor-in-chief of British Vogue, which is owned by Condé Nast, since 2017. In 2016, he was awarded an OBE in 2016 for his services to diversity in the fashion industry.

Read more:

British Vogue editor Edward Enninful says Meghan Markle told him not to call her 'Duchess' months before leaving the royal family

The first female publisher in the history of British Vogue told us the magazine isn't the 'cold and frosty place' it's made out to be

'It can't be easy to be a Black employee at Vogue': Vogue EIC Anna Wintour acknowledges 'hurtful or intolerant' content from magazine

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