Your Blood Type May Predict Your Risk of an Early Stroke, Says New Research

Your blood type may predict your risk of an early stroke, says new research. According to a study in Neurology, published in September of last year. "Researchers found that people with early stroke were more likely to have blood type A and less likely to have blood type O compared to people with late stroke and people without stroke. Both early and late stroke were also more likely to have blood type B compared to controls," says the American Academy of Neurology. Read on to see how you can tell if you might have an early stroke.

1

What the Research Found

closeup of a blood bag with a label with the text O RH positive and a stethoscope
closeup of a blood bag with a label with the text O RH positive and a stethoscope

"When looking at people of European ancestry and comparing 5,825 people with early stroke to 29,320 people who did not have a stroke, the meta-analysis found that 48% of people with early stroke had blood type A compared to 45% of people with late stroke and 44% of people without stroke. They also found 35% of people with early stroke had blood type O compared to 39% of those with late stroke and 41% of people without stroke."

2

Why Your Blood Type Matters

Beautiful gorgeous 50s mid aged mature woman looking at camera isolated on white. Mature old lady close up portrait. Healthy face skin care beauty, middle age skincare cosmetics, cosmetology concept
Beautiful gorgeous 50s mid aged mature woman looking at camera isolated on white. Mature old lady close up portrait. Healthy face skin care beauty, middle age skincare cosmetics, cosmetology concept

Blood type is a classification of blood based on the presence or absence of certain antigens on the surface of red blood cells. The most important blood type antigens are the ABO antigens, which are found on the surface of red blood cells and are inherited from a person's parents. There are four main blood types: A, B, AB, and O. Blood type is important because it determines what type of blood a person can safely receive during a blood transfusion. It is also important in cases of organ transplantation, as certain blood types are more compatible with certain organs than others.

3

What Else Your Blood Type Can Show You

Blood type medical concept with doctor in the background and blood drop from his finger
Blood type medical concept with doctor in the background and blood drop from his finger

Your blood type can predict which types of blood you can safely receive during a blood transfusion and can also be a factor in determining compatibility for organ transplantation. Beyond that, scientists are still trying to pin down whether or not blood type can predict anything else about a person's health or characteristics. Some people believe that blood type can influence a person's personality or susceptibility to certain medical conditions, but these beliefs are not supported by scientific evidence. It is important to remember that many factors, including genetics, lifestyle, and environment, can influence a person's health and well-being, and it is not accurate or helpful to attribute these things to a person's blood type alone.

4

Types of Strokes

Man with a headache - Stroke -3D Illustration
Man with a headache – Stroke -3D Illustration

A stroke is a medical emergency that occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, depriving brain cells of oxygen and nutrients. This can happen in two main ways:

Ischemic stroke: This type of stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain, cutting off the blood supply to the brain cells.

Hemorrhagic stroke: This type of stroke occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures and bleeds into the surrounding brain tissue.

Both types of stroke can cause brain cells to die, leading to a wide range of potential symptoms, including weakness or paralysis on one side of the body, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, trouble seeing in one or both eyes, dizziness or loss of balance, and severe headache. Stroke is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. Treatment for stroke may include medications to dissolve blood clots, surgery to repair blood vessels, and rehabilitation to help the person recover from any lingering effects of the stroke.

5

How to Avoid a Stroke

Young woman eating a healthy salad after workout. Fitness and healthy lifestyle concept.
Young woman eating a healthy salad after workout. Fitness and healthy lifestyle concept.

There are several things that you can do to help reduce your risk of having a stroke:

Maintain a healthy blood pressure: High blood pressure is a major risk factor for stroke, so it is important to have your blood pressure checked regularly and work with your healthcare provider to keep it under control.

Eat a healthy diet: A diet that is high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and low in salt, saturated fat, and trans fat can help reduce your risk of stroke.

Exercise regularly: Engaging in regular physical activity can help lower your blood pressure, improve blood flow, and keep your weight in a healthy range, all of which can help reduce your risk of stroke.

Don't smoke: Smoking increases your risk of stroke, as well as many other serious health problems. If you smoke, quitting can significantly reduce your risk of stroke.

Limit your alcohol intake: Drinking too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure and increase your risk of stroke.

Manage any medical conditions you have: If you have conditions such as diabetes, atrial fibrillation, or high cholesterol, it is important to work with your healthcare provider to manage these conditions effectively, as they can increase your risk of stroke.

By making lifestyle changes and working with your healthcare provider to address any underlying medical conditions, you can help reduce your risk of stroke and improve your overall health.