Artist Panteha Abareshi Uses Art to Show What Chronic Illness Actually Looks Like

Julia Metraux
Two of Panteha Abareshi's pieces of art
Two of Panteha Abareshi's pieces of art

What happened: Artist Panteha Abareshi, who has sickle cell beta zero thalassemia, spoke to gal-dem about her art. In the profile, Abareshi discussed what it is like to watch able-bodied people during the coronavirus outbreak “suddenly thinking about their own health in a more frantic state,” which is the norm for chronically ill people. Abareshi also criticized the taboo nature surrounding prosthetics and the inherent ableism of our world.

It’s the radical notion that that is the next step in evolution. These pieces of metal are what holds me together. I’m no longer an organic body, and I no longer adhere to a lot of what defines being human. They’re ableist standards. Everything in medicine is trying to imitate the able body and I’m tired of it. — Panteha Abareshi, gal-dem

Related:Download The Mighty app to connect in real time with people who can relate to what you're going through.

The FrontlinesArtists like Abareshi continue to push barriers of what being sick looks like through their artwork. She showcases what it is like to be chronically ill in a world where a lot of people do not understand living with a chronic condition.

Get more on chronic illness: Sign up for our weekly chronic illness newsletter.

A Mighty voice: Contributor Amanda Stelcova wrote about how creating mixed-media art helps her cope with living with chronic vestibular migraine. “It held me completely in the present moment and brought meaning back into the huge void in my life created by chronic illness.” You can submit your first-person story, too.

Related:Effort to Control Opioids in an ER Leaves Some Sickle Cell Patients in Pain

From our community

Add your voice:

A banner promoting The Mighty's new Pencil Case group on The Mighty mobile app. The banner reads, Looking for creative ways to reflect, slow down, practice self-care and check in with yourself? In The Pencil Case group, we support each other in doing just that. Click to join.
A banner promoting The Mighty's new Pencil Case group on The Mighty mobile app. The banner reads, Looking for creative ways to reflect, slow down, practice self-care and check in with yourself? In The Pencil Case group, we support each other in doing just that. Click to join.

Other things to know: There are many other artists who express what it is like to live with mental illness, disability, cancer and more. One thing that many of these artworks have in common is that they try to send a message, like Abareshi’s work. If you want to see the work of other artists who touch on health, here are some you can check out:

Where to learn more: If you want to support Abareshi, you can follow her on Instagram or purchase a piece of artwork. You can also support other chronically ill artists like bedmonk and Savannah Hudson.

Read more stories like this on The Mighty:

To the NHS on Its 70th Birthday: Thank You for Caring for Me and My Family

How I Take Charge of My Own Care as Someone With Sickle Cell Disease

The Job Description of a Chronic Illness Warrior

When I Was Questioned for Using a Disabled Parking Placard

More From