Amazon's 'Lord of the Rings' TV series finally has a premiere date

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lord of the rings
The upcoming Amazon show won't follow Frodo and the other familiar hobbits from Peter Jackson's movie trilogy. Warner Bros.
  • Amazon's "Lord of the Rings" original series will premiere on September 2, 2022.

  • Amazon Studios released the first image from the forthcoming series.

  • Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Robert Aramayo, Owain Arthur, and Maxim Bald are among the ensemble cast.

  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

Amazon's "The Lord of the Rings" TV series finally has an official premiere date.

The studio announced Monday that the show had wrapped filming of its first season in New Zealand and will be premiering on September 2, 2022. Amazon announced the news alongside the first official image from the series, which will have a weekly release schedule.

Here's the first look at the upcoming series:

Lord of the Rings Amazon TV show first look image
Amazon's first look at its upcoming "Lord of the Rings" TV series. Amazon Studios

The series' full cast, which includes two "Game of Thrones" actors, was previously announced in January 2020, Insider's Jacob Sarkisian previously reported.

Per Deadline's new report, the ensemble will be headlined by: Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Robert Aramayo, Owain Arthur, Maxim Baldry, Nazanin Boniadi, Morfydd Clark, Ismael Cruz Córdova, Charles Edwards, Trystan Gravelle, Sir Lenny Henry, Ema Horvath, Markella Kavenagh, Joseph Mawle, Tyroe Muhafidin, Sophia Nomvete, Lloyd Owen, Megan Richards, Dylan Smith, Charlie Vickers, Leon Wadham, Benjamin Walker, Daniel Weyman, and Sara Zwangobani.

The show, which doesn't have a title yet, has been developed by J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay, who also serve as coshowrunners and two of the series' executive producers.

Amazon first bought the TV rights to adapt JRR Tolkien's beloved fantasy story for $250 million in 2017. An April 2021 report revealed that the first season alone would cost $465 million to produce.

The Hollywood Reporter estimated shortly after Amazon's deal was announced in November 2017 that the show, which is expected to run for five seasons, could cost $1 billion in its entirety - which would make it far and away the most expensive TV show of all time.

Read the original article on Insider