Creepy footage shows stranger talking to woman through Bose speaker: 'Who are you?'

Morgan Greenwald

A TikTok user shared some chilling videos of what appears to be a stranger talking through her Bose speaker.

On April 21, TikTok user Opikanopi uploaded two videos of the strange experience to her account.

“My boyfriend and I were in our living room around 1 a.m. when we started hearing a voice from our Bose speaker,” she wrote.

“Hewwo? Are you still there?” a male voice can be heard saying from the direction of the speaker.

Opikanopi said she didn’t realize the speaker also worked as a walkie talkie, so she responded, “Hewwo?”

When the stranger directly responds, Opikanopi asks, “Can you hear me?”

“Yes, I can hear you… who is this?” the stranger says.

Um, what?!

@opikanopi

Always turn off your devices 🤭 ##foryou

♬ original sound - opikanopi

In the next video, the stranger reveals that he is talking through his phone. This only leads to more questions than answers, though, seeing as the stranger says he is located in Kentucky while Opikanopi is in Tennessee. (According to Opikanopi, the Bose speaker has a Bluetooth radius of 30 feet.)

@opikanopi

Part 2 ##randomthings##foryou

♬ original sound - opikanopi

Given the silly voice the stranger uses at the beginning of the video, many commenters believed he was trying to get a child’s attention.

“That scares me so much because he might’ve been talking to a child and then got disconnected,” one person said.

“Someone close enough in range to connect to your speaker … looking to lure a child … file a police report,” another user added.

“People do this all the time to try to lure kids,” a third person commented. “Notice how his voice changed? Secure everything.”

Bose only recently became aware of this supposed security breach. In an email to In The Know, a representative for Bose said, “We just became aware of this earlier today.  We’re reaching out to the customer to learn more.”

This isn’t the first time that the security of Bose speakers has been questioned. In 2017, researchers at Trend Micro tested a few Bose speaker models and found that they could be accessed and controlled remotely.

“The unfortunate reality is that these devices assume the network they’re sitting on is trusted, and we all should know better than that at this point,” Mark Nunnikhoven, a Trend Micro research director, told Wired at the time. “Anyone can go in and start controlling your speaker sounds” so long as your internet isn’t secure.

In the past, virtual intruders have hacked devices to cause chaos. Back in December 2019, for instance, a Texas family released a video of a stranger screaming through their Ring devices to the point that the police got involved.

If you enjoyed this story, check out this Ring employee who was fired for spying on customers.

More from In The Know:

Chipotle admits burrito bowls might not be safe to eat

Get $400 off this smart TV shoppers love: ‘The Roku integration sold me”

20 amazing sales happening now that you won’t want to miss

Shoppers say this $45 bed desk makes working from home enjoyable

The post Creepy footage shows stranger talking through Bose speaker appeared first on In The Know.