18 Reasons to Fall in Love With Getting Dressed Again

Esquire Editors
·3 mins read
Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

From Esquire

Fall is here, which means it's (say it with us now) time to really start dressin'! Of course, this comes on the heels of many months squirreled away indoors, swaddled in sweats and, perhaps, feeling the appeal of putting on proper clothes start to slip away. Don't give in to that impulse. There's no better season than the current one to fall back in love with getting dressed. And couldn't we all use a little more love in our lives right now?

In case you need a little extra convincing, here are 18 reasons to keep the faith—and keep your closet on-point. Enjoy.

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Small but not exactly subtle accessories, from statement-making necklaces to avant-garde earrings to intricately detailed rings worn by the bunch.

All Power Fist necklace ($150) by Johnny Nelson, johnnynelson.nyc

Photo credit: DENZEL GOLATT/COURTESY PYER MOSS
Photo credit: DENZEL GOLATT/COURTESY PYER MOSS

The release of American, Also, a documentary chronicling the two-year lead-up to the stunning spring/summer 2020 Pyer Moss fashion show honoring sister Rosetta Tharpe, the inventor of rock 'n' roll.

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Raf at Prada.

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Enjoying knitwear at its most functional. Let there be cold, and not just that of the air conditioner. Bring on the big sweaters.

Sweater ($635) by Kingsman, mrporter.com

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Photo credit: Getty Images

Martine Rose’s impeccably executed gun-check topcoat.

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Cuban-heeled boots, for a little more height and a lot more vibe.

Boots ($1,250) by Giuseppe Zanotti, giuseppezanotti.com

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Contentious Proposition No. 1: Wear a tie to your job. It will confuse everyone, but it’s so alien that it might just work.

Tie ($205 for similar) by Liverano & Liverano, thearmoury.com

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Contentious Proposition No. 2: Pop your collar. What once said “pretentious” now says “easygoing”—or at least “artfully audacious”—if deployed correctly.

Vintage-inspired jeans from Glenn’s Denim, which combine Glenn Liburd’s mastery of denim construction with fits that pay homage to NYC’s subcultural heyday of the '70s and '80s.

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Photo credit: Getty Images

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Simple, monochromatic dressing. The look—easier said than done—telegraphs a less conspicuous kind of luxury that favors texture and proportion over big, brash logos.

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Photo credit: Courtesy

The new vintage boom, which is turning real rarity—not just manufactured scarcity—into clout.

Vintage Barbour jacket from The Rag Parade

Photo credit: Grace Miller (James), Darrel Hunter (Wagner), Courtesy BFA (Charles).
Photo credit: Grace Miller (James), Darrel Hunter (Wagner), Courtesy BFA (Charles).

Organizations like the Black In Fashion Council—led by Sandrine Charles (bottom right) and Lindsay Peoples Wagner (center)—and efforts like the Fifteen Percent Pledge—led by Aurora James (top left)—which aim to address systemic racism in fashion and get more shelf space devoted to Black-owned brands.

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Photo credit: Getty Images

Going DIY by chopping the collar off a denim shirt or distressing the cuffs and hem of a lightweight sweater. It’ll give new life to stuff you might have forgotten was even in your closet.

Photo credit: Florence Sullivan
Photo credit: Florence Sullivan

Carrying a bag. Because you’re going somewhere, and you need the stuff—from your laptop to your hand sanitizer—inside of it. (Doesn’t hurt if the bag itself looks pretty great, too.)

Premier briefcase ($3,850) by Valextra, valextra.com

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Just-right, high-end workwear from the eponymous label of Toledo-born Darryl Brown, who logged time as a steelworker and a railroad engineer before launching his own brand.

Photo credit: Allie Holloway
Photo credit: Allie Holloway

The jersey suit, a transition item that bridges the gap from summer to fall and the move from indoor comfort to outdoor style.

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Photo credit: Courtesy

Wearing an automatic watch regularly enough that it tells the correct time and date again.

Prospex automatic diver watch ($595) by Seiko, seikousa.com

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Photo credit: Getty Images

London-based designer Nicholas Daley’s ability to take elements of the abstract and the familiar—like a hand- drawn, nigh-psychedelic riff on classic camo—and make them feel right at home together.

Shirt jacket ($622 for green colorway) by Nicholas Daley, farfetch.com

A version of this story appears in the September 2020 issue of Esquire magazine

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