6 Ways Stress Is Messing With Your Skin

(Photo: PeopleImages via Getty Images)
(Photo: PeopleImages via Getty Images)

We all deal with different stresses, whether related to our jobs, our families, the cities we live in or the constant struggle to do it all.

But as Dr. Joshua Zeichner, the director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, told HuffPost, “Stress is not our friend, neither for our mind nor for our skin.”

Our skin is the largest organ in our bodies, and it can show signs of stress in a number of different ways, such as psoriasis and eczema flare-ups, seborrheic dermatitis and even acne.

Of course, everyone’s body and skin will react to stress in different ways, as we all have different genetic makeups. However, according to Dr. Whitney Bowe, a New York City-based dermatologist and the author of The Beauty of Dirty Skin, our skin can’t tell the difference between different types of stress — physical, emotional, psychological and environmental.

“To the skin, stress falls into one of two categories: acute or chronic,” she told HuffPost via email. “The more detrimental form of stress for the skin is the chronic kind of stress. The longer you endure stress, the more it takes a toll on your skin.”

Read on to find out the different ways stress can affect your skin and the rest of your body.

1. Stress triggers inflammation

To better understand how stress might affect and inflame the skin, Bowe said she looks at the “deep and powerful connection” of the skin, mind and gut. According to her, when the mind perceives stress, it can slow down digestion in the gut. The longer the stress lasts, the more of an impact it can have on your digestion, and when your digestion is slowed, it can affect the bacteria in your gut. A recent study found that high levels of stress can affect the gut bacteria much like a high-fat diet.

“That slowed motility allows for an overgrowth of unhealthy strains of bacteria, and the natural balance of gut microbes is disrupted, leading to something called dysbiosis,” she said. “This in turn causes the lining of your intestines to become ‘leaky,’ or more permeable, which triggers a bodywide cascade of inflammation.”

As a result of the internal inflammation, she said, the skin may break out in acne or experience flare-ups of psoriasis or eczema.

Dr. Forum Patel of Union Square Laser Dermatology in New York City echoed Bowe’s point, explaining that when you’re under stress, “Your body thinks it’s under attack, and it’s going to form all these inflammatory markers or inflammatory cells to help treat that attack.”

Because these inflammatory cells have increased in number, it can trigger flare-ups of any skin conditions people may be predisposed to.

2. Stress can dry your skin out

Whenever our body feels it’s under stress, our fight-or-flight response kicks in, Patel noted. As a result, we experience a spike in adrenaline and cortisol.

An increase in adrenaline causes us to sweat more, she noted. It activates the eccrine glands, the sweat glands, which “cause you to become dehydrated, because you’re losing a lot more water very quickly,” she said.

“If your body thinks it’s under some sort of stress, it’s trying to cool itself down,” she said. “If you’re not replenishing your body with water, you’re going to dry out.”

Those who have dry skin in general are more prone to eczema, Patel said. Dr. Michael Eidelman, a dermatologist also based in New York City, added that stress is a known trigger for eczema, which brings us to our next point.

3. Stress hormones can trigger existing conditions to worsen or flare up

The theory is that the immune system is directly affected by stress, Eidelman said.

He noted that stress releases hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline into our systems — “chemical messages that trigger certain physiological responses” in our bodies. For instance, adrenaline increases the heart rate and elevates blood pressure, and cortisol increases sugar in the bloodstream, according to the Mayo Clinic.

In terms of the skin, when the body produces too much cortisol, the immune system is weakened, causing an inflammatory response such as an eczema or psoriasis flare-up. This factor is particularly relevant for individuals who are predisposed to these skin conditions, Bowe said, as stress can “exacerbate or unmask those conditions.”

(Photo: Bunlue Nantaprom / EyeEm via Getty Images)
(Photo: Bunlue Nantaprom / EyeEm via Getty Images)

4. Stress can also make you oilier, which could lead to acne breakouts

That shift in hormone levels ― cortisol in particular ― caused by stress can also be a contributing factor to pesky acne breakouts.

“Stress stimulates the brain to produce a specific set of hormones that prepare the body for the stressful environment,” Zeichner said. “As a side effect, these hormones rev up activity of sebaceous glands in the skin, leading to higher than normal levels of oil, blockages in the pores and acne breakouts.”

5. Stress can also take a toll on your scalp and hair

When it comes to your scalp and hair, there are a couple of ways stress can manifest.

According to Patel, some people might find their hair is oilier or drier than normal during times of stress, depending on the way their bodies react to the shift in hormone levels.

“Everyone’s response is going to be different in severity, she said. “Your scalp and your hair will definitely feel the effects of stress.”

Some individuals might experience flare-ups of seborrheic dermatitis, a cousin to psoriasis and dandruff, Eidelman said. The condition could result in redness and flaking of the scalp.

In some cases, stress can even lead to hair loss, Patel said. For example, when your body experiences a major stressor, like a severe illness, your body stops producing hair, which isn’t crucial for healing or surviving. The effects of such stress might not be noticeable until months later, she added.

She also said that hair often starts shedding even after minor stresses. She pointed to the keto diet ― which she called a crash diet ― as one example, noting that when you put your body through a significant change, it’s essentially a stressor.

6. Stress can wreak havoc on your nails

The same way your body stops producing hair in times of prolonged stress, it also stops making nails, Patel said. Again, she said, nails are not necessary for survival, so when it comes time for the body to distribute energy to promote healing, nails aren’t a top priority.

Additionally, nails can become brittle or start peeling during times of stress, according to Science Daily.

So how should you take care of your skin when you’re stressed out?

Zeichner said it’s best to keep your skin care routine simple by using gentle cleansers and moisturizers to remove excess oil and keep the skin well hydrated (particularly important for those with eczema).

For individuals who are acne prone, he suggested regular use of retinoids to “keep the follicles clear so that oil does not become trapped, causing breakouts.”

In Bowe’s opinion, managing stress is a multifaceted effort. She said she recommends that her patients aim to get a solid seven to nine hours of sleep, exercise three or four times a week and consider meditation or deep breathing exercises.

Eidelman agreed, saying there isn’t one single method for treating skin that’s under stress.

“I think the first thing is being aware that your body is under stress and trying to find ways to either ameliorate the stress or find ways to release the stress,” he said, adding that exercise and meditation have been known to help some individuals feel less stressed.

“There isn’t one right answer for each person, but there are different things that will work for each individual, depending on what their stress triggers are,” he said.

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Look For A Lighter Sunscreen With The Same Protection

Fact: Summer's heat and humidity can do a number on your skin. To give your complexion a break this season, try lightening up your skincare routine by switching to a gel or liquid sunscreen.     Why? "These products soak in faster and are less likely to leave you looking and feeling greasy," explains Jessica Wu, M.D., a Los Angeles dermatologist and author of the book, "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Feed-Your-Face-Beautiful-Delicious/dp/0312630778" target="_hplink">Feed Your Face</a>."     Acne prone? Go oil-free to avoid clogging your more sensitive pores. Dr. Wu recommends <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Kiehls-Super-Fluid-Defense-SPF/dp/B003QBJTF2" target="_hplink">Kiehls Super Fluid UV Defense</a>, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Neutrogena-Ultra-Sheer-Liquid-Sunblock/dp/B003901LEW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309286847&sr=1-2" target="_hplink">Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Sunscreen Fluid</a> or <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Clarins-Plus-Screen-High-Protection/dp/B004LX1YES/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309286895&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Clarins UV Plus Day Screen SPF 40</a>. "These dry quickly so your makeup goes on smoothly and evenly," she says.     Have a darker complexion? You aren't immune to sun damage, says Dr. Wu. Sunscreen is still crucial to avoid melasma, sun spots and skin cancer, so don't skimp just because you don't think you will burn!    <strong>More from <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/" target="_hplink">iVillage</a>:</strong>    <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/sleep-deprived-no-more-cleveland-clinic-sleep-expert-answers-your-top-10-qs-0/4-b-360330?par=aol" target="_hplink">Sleep Deprived No More! Cleveland Clinic Experts Answer Your Top 10 Qs</a>  <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/7-foods-lower-cholesterol/4-b-121656?par=aol" target="_hplink">7 Foods That Lower Cholesterol</a>  <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/best-ways-beat-depression-without-drugs/4-b-299809?par=aol]" target="_hplink">Best Ways to Treat Depression Without Drugs</a>
Fact: Summer's heat and humidity can do a number on your skin. To give your complexion a break this season, try lightening up your skincare routine by switching to a gel or liquid sunscreen. Why? "These products soak in faster and are less likely to leave you looking and feeling greasy," explains Jessica Wu, M.D., a Los Angeles dermatologist and author of the book, "Feed Your Face." Acne prone? Go oil-free to avoid clogging your more sensitive pores. Dr. Wu recommends Kiehls Super Fluid UV Defense, Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Sunscreen Fluid or Clarins UV Plus Day Screen SPF 40. "These dry quickly so your makeup goes on smoothly and evenly," she says. Have a darker complexion? You aren't immune to sun damage, says Dr. Wu. Sunscreen is still crucial to avoid melasma, sun spots and skin cancer, so don't skimp just because you don't think you will burn! More from iVillage: Sleep Deprived No More! Cleveland Clinic Experts Answer Your Top 10 Qs 7 Foods That Lower Cholesterol Best Ways to Treat Depression Without Drugs

Minimize Your Moisturizer

As the weather heats up, you have to adapt your skincare routine to the changes in temperature and humidity (not to mention activities).     In the summertime, it's all about swapping out heavy products that can combine with sweat and turn your face into an oil slick, clogging your pores and leading to breakouts. You'll look fresher and your makeup will last longer if you swap your heavy facial cream for a lightweight formula.     You can also eliminate an entire step from your routine -- and beauty product clutter -- with a combination sunscreen and moisturizer. Dr. Wu likes <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Aveeno-Smart-Essentials-Nourishing-Moisturizer/dp/B004D282D8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309286522&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Aveeno Smart Essentials Daily Moisturizing Lotion with SPF 30</a>. Her skin-saving advice: "Only apply this product to dry skin patches and avoid the oilier T-zone."
As the weather heats up, you have to adapt your skincare routine to the changes in temperature and humidity (not to mention activities). In the summertime, it's all about swapping out heavy products that can combine with sweat and turn your face into an oil slick, clogging your pores and leading to breakouts. You'll look fresher and your makeup will last longer if you swap your heavy facial cream for a lightweight formula. You can also eliminate an entire step from your routine -- and beauty product clutter -- with a combination sunscreen and moisturizer. Dr. Wu likes Aveeno Smart Essentials Daily Moisturizing Lotion with SPF 30. Her skin-saving advice: "Only apply this product to dry skin patches and avoid the oilier T-zone."

Stop Sweat Before It Starts

Take action as soon as you step out of the shower to stave off perspiration for the rest of the day, suggests Dr. Wu. You haven't got a chance if you're already sweating before you get to the deodorant, so she suggests using a hair dryer to blow cool air under your arms before you apply.     If this doesn't cut it, extra strength antiperspirants (such as <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Dove-Clinical-Protection-Original-1-7-Ounce/dp/B001ECQ56Q/ref=sr_1_1?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309287160&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Dove Clinical Protection</a> or <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Clinical-Strength-Advanced-1-6-Ounce/dp/B001F51VS4/ref=sr_1_1?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309287181&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Secret Clinical Strength</a>) might do the trick.     In extreme cases, Dr. Wu says your dermatologist might recommend Botox injections to help with excessive sweating. "Botox stops sweating by blocking the signal from the nerve endings that tell the sweat glands to secrete sweat," she explains.
Take action as soon as you step out of the shower to stave off perspiration for the rest of the day, suggests Dr. Wu. You haven't got a chance if you're already sweating before you get to the deodorant, so she suggests using a hair dryer to blow cool air under your arms before you apply. If this doesn't cut it, extra strength antiperspirants (such as Dove Clinical Protection or Secret Clinical Strength) might do the trick. In extreme cases, Dr. Wu says your dermatologist might recommend Botox injections to help with excessive sweating. "Botox stops sweating by blocking the signal from the nerve endings that tell the sweat glands to secrete sweat," she explains.

Protect Your Hair From The Elements

"Sun, salt water and chlorine can really dry out your hair, leading to split ends and ruining your color," Dr. Wu says. To prevent this problem, rinse your hair with fresh water and apply conditioner when you get out of the pool or ocean. This can also keep the metals in pool water from turning blond hair green, she says.     If you wear a part or have thinning hair, rub some SPF into your scalp to prevent painful burning. For coarser hair, Dr. Wu also recommends staying away from oil-based hair products, which can make your mane look and feel greasy. "Instead, switch to an oil-free hair serum and only use it as needed to tame frizz."
"Sun, salt water and chlorine can really dry out your hair, leading to split ends and ruining your color," Dr. Wu says. To prevent this problem, rinse your hair with fresh water and apply conditioner when you get out of the pool or ocean. This can also keep the metals in pool water from turning blond hair green, she says. If you wear a part or have thinning hair, rub some SPF into your scalp to prevent painful burning. For coarser hair, Dr. Wu also recommends staying away from oil-based hair products, which can make your mane look and feel greasy. "Instead, switch to an oil-free hair serum and only use it as needed to tame frizz."

Be Mindful When Getting A Mani-Pedi

Making time for a manicure? Bring along your own polish and tools to the nail salon so you know they're sanitary, suggests Dr. Wu, since if not properly cleaned, manicure instruments can expose you to infection-causing bacteria. Next, ask your manicurist not to cut your cuticles.     The reason: "Cuticles are there to protect the nails and keep bacteria and fungus from getting underneath your skin, so there should be a tight seal between your cuticle and your nail," Dr. Wu says.     Doing an at-home manicure? Look for a nail polish remover without formaldehyde -- this chemical can dry out your nails and skin, spurring painful splits, says Dr. Wu. Lastly, to combat cracks and dry cuticles, she suggests sweet almond oil. It's high in emollient, skin-saving omega-3 fatty acids, so it won't wash away with soap and water.
Making time for a manicure? Bring along your own polish and tools to the nail salon so you know they're sanitary, suggests Dr. Wu, since if not properly cleaned, manicure instruments can expose you to infection-causing bacteria. Next, ask your manicurist not to cut your cuticles. The reason: "Cuticles are there to protect the nails and keep bacteria and fungus from getting underneath your skin, so there should be a tight seal between your cuticle and your nail," Dr. Wu says. Doing an at-home manicure? Look for a nail polish remover without formaldehyde -- this chemical can dry out your nails and skin, spurring painful splits, says Dr. Wu. Lastly, to combat cracks and dry cuticles, she suggests sweet almond oil. It's high in emollient, skin-saving omega-3 fatty acids, so it won't wash away with soap and water.

Use Sunscreen To Avoid Under-Eye Bags

Over time, the sun's strong UV rays can break down the collagen and elastic tissue in your skin, making it looser. "This is especially apparent around the eyes, since the skin in this area is thinner than in the rest of your face and lacks oil glands," Dr. Wu says.     However, using creamy sunscreens around your eyes can lead to milia cysts -- small, unsightly white bumps filled with oil and dead skin. To avoid the appearance of eye bags, Dr. Wu suggests using a quick-drying sunscreen liquid or gel. If you're into summer sports, she recommends a water resistant formula, such as <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Roche-Posay-Anthelios-Ultra-Sunscreen-1-7-Ounce/dp/B003KW8V7E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309287709&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Anthelios SPF 45 Ultra Light Sunscreen Fluid for Face</a>, because it stays put and won't sting your eyes.
Over time, the sun's strong UV rays can break down the collagen and elastic tissue in your skin, making it looser. "This is especially apparent around the eyes, since the skin in this area is thinner than in the rest of your face and lacks oil glands," Dr. Wu says. However, using creamy sunscreens around your eyes can lead to milia cysts -- small, unsightly white bumps filled with oil and dead skin. To avoid the appearance of eye bags, Dr. Wu suggests using a quick-drying sunscreen liquid or gel. If you're into summer sports, she recommends a water resistant formula, such as Anthelios SPF 45 Ultra Light Sunscreen Fluid for Face, because it stays put and won't sting your eyes.

Shower Before Shaving For A Smoother Bikini Line

If you prefer shaving your bikini line over waxing, Dr. Wu recommends shaving at the end of your shower, when the hair is softer and your skin is less sensitive (your pores are open and supple). When you hop out of the shower, immediately apply a gentle lotion to the area.     A warning: Shaving can sometimes lead to ingrown hairs -- the tip of the hair grows into the surrounding skin causing a pink bump. If you notice an ingrown hair, resist the urge to use tweezers or try to squeeze it!     "Instead, if you see a hair trapped just under the skin, lift the tip of the hair with a clean needle -- if you can reach it without making it bleed -- to help it pop back up through the surface." You don't want to pull the hair out from the root because you will irritate the follicle and aggravate surrounding skin.
If you prefer shaving your bikini line over waxing, Dr. Wu recommends shaving at the end of your shower, when the hair is softer and your skin is less sensitive (your pores are open and supple). When you hop out of the shower, immediately apply a gentle lotion to the area. A warning: Shaving can sometimes lead to ingrown hairs -- the tip of the hair grows into the surrounding skin causing a pink bump. If you notice an ingrown hair, resist the urge to use tweezers or try to squeeze it! "Instead, if you see a hair trapped just under the skin, lift the tip of the hair with a clean needle -- if you can reach it without making it bleed -- to help it pop back up through the surface." You don't want to pull the hair out from the root because you will irritate the follicle and aggravate surrounding skin.

Banish Body Acne With Salicylic Acid

Breakouts on places other than your face are definitely more common in the summer months, says Dr. Wu. Why? Sweat can stick to your clothes and cause friction or clog pores, both of which can result in pimples on your chest, back, backside and elsewhere.     To safeguard yourself, Dr. Wu recommends using a body wash with salicylic acid, like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Neutrogena-Body-Clear-Grapefruit-Ounces/dp/B001EUS62Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309288061&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Neutrogena Body Clear Pink Grapefruit</a>, to dry out body acne. And don't skimp on exfoliating just because your skin's less dry in the summer, especially if you use a self-tanning spray or lotion.     "Dead skin grabs onto self tanner so it looks darker in dry areas, and you end up looking blotchy," Dr. Wu says. Using a body scrub in the shower will help clear away dead skin so the tint can absorb more evenly. Dr. Wu recommends <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Brown-Sugar-Body-Polish/dp/B003654U48/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309288097&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Fresh Brown Sugar Body Polish</a> and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Burts-Bees-Sugar-Cranberry-Pomegranate/dp/B003VUMMLQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309288122&sr=1-1" target="_hplink">Burt's Bees Cranberry & Pomegranate Sugar Scrub</a>.
Breakouts on places other than your face are definitely more common in the summer months, says Dr. Wu. Why? Sweat can stick to your clothes and cause friction or clog pores, both of which can result in pimples on your chest, back, backside and elsewhere. To safeguard yourself, Dr. Wu recommends using a body wash with salicylic acid, like Neutrogena Body Clear Pink Grapefruit, to dry out body acne. And don't skimp on exfoliating just because your skin's less dry in the summer, especially if you use a self-tanning spray or lotion. "Dead skin grabs onto self tanner so it looks darker in dry areas, and you end up looking blotchy," Dr. Wu says. Using a body scrub in the shower will help clear away dead skin so the tint can absorb more evenly. Dr. Wu recommends Fresh Brown Sugar Body Polish and Burt's Bees Cranberry & Pomegranate Sugar Scrub.

Green Tea Can Soothe A Sunburn

Research shows that green <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12871030" target="_hplink">tea can have positive benefits for the skin</a>, like reducing inflammation and fighting cancer-causing carcinogens. For instance, to soothe sunburn, Dr. Wu suggests applying a cool green tea compress for five to 10 minutes, two to three times a day.    "Dip a thin washcloth in cold green tea, wring it out and apply to your sunburn to help relieve redness, swelling and pain," she says. During the rest of the day, she advises using Aloe Vera gel and an anti-inflammatory painkiller, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, to bring down swelling. Try an over-the-counter cortisone cream if the burn gets itchy as it heals.     To avoid looking like a lobster again in the future, Dr. Wu advises thinking ahead: "In the future, try eating more cooked tomatoes." Research at the Universities of Newcastle and Manchester has shown <a href="http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press.office/press.release/item/1209390017" target="_hplink">that the lycopene in tomato-based foods can protect against painful sunburn and sun damage</a>.
Research shows that green tea can have positive benefits for the skin, like reducing inflammation and fighting cancer-causing carcinogens. For instance, to soothe sunburn, Dr. Wu suggests applying a cool green tea compress for five to 10 minutes, two to three times a day. "Dip a thin washcloth in cold green tea, wring it out and apply to your sunburn to help relieve redness, swelling and pain," she says. During the rest of the day, she advises using Aloe Vera gel and an anti-inflammatory painkiller, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, to bring down swelling. Try an over-the-counter cortisone cream if the burn gets itchy as it heals. To avoid looking like a lobster again in the future, Dr. Wu advises thinking ahead: "In the future, try eating more cooked tomatoes." Research at the Universities of Newcastle and Manchester has shown that the lycopene in tomato-based foods can protect against painful sunburn and sun damage.

Pamper Your Feet For Soft, Fresh Skin

In the summertime, our feet can't seem to catch a break. Wearing sweaty shoes and socks can give rise to an itchy infection like athlete's foot, but sandals can lead to painful cracks and calluses. To keep away moisture, which creates a perfect breeding ground for bacteria and fungus, Dr. Wu suggests using a deodorant foot powder, such as <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Scholls-Original-Powder-Soothes/dp/B0013L3Y6M/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309288422&sr=1-2" target="_hplink">Dr. Scholl's Original Foot Powder</a>, and letting your feet breathe whenever you can.     For cracked heels and rough spots she recommends soaking your feet in warm water and using a foot paddle, like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Opi-Pedicure-Foot-File/dp/B00134VIXA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1309288458&sr=1-2" target="_hplink">OPI Pedicure Foot File</a> or <a href="http://www.amazon.com/DIAMANCEL-Buffer-Extra-Strength-Model/dp/B003B6SSWC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1309288490&sr=1-1-catcorr" target="_hplink">Diamancel Foot Paddle</a>, or a pumice stone to slough off dead skin. "Afterwards, rub on a rich foot cream and put on socks to lock in the moisture."
In the summertime, our feet can't seem to catch a break. Wearing sweaty shoes and socks can give rise to an itchy infection like athlete's foot, but sandals can lead to painful cracks and calluses. To keep away moisture, which creates a perfect breeding ground for bacteria and fungus, Dr. Wu suggests using a deodorant foot powder, such as Dr. Scholl's Original Foot Powder, and letting your feet breathe whenever you can. For cracked heels and rough spots she recommends soaking your feet in warm water and using a foot paddle, like OPI Pedicure Foot File or Diamancel Foot Paddle, or a pumice stone to slough off dead skin. "Afterwards, rub on a rich foot cream and put on socks to lock in the moisture."

Cool Down To Fight A Rosacea Flare Up

When you have rosacea -- a condition spurring redness, swelling and small pimples on your face -- it often causes your face to flush so you look like you're blushing. It can flare up more frequently and intensely in high temperatures.     Dr. Wu's advice is to take any steps necessary to keep yourself cool. "I recommend carrying a spray mister of water," she says. "If you're in the car, spray your face and turn the air conditioner vent towards you."     Heat and steam from hot drinks can also worsen flushing, so get that latte or tea over ice, and skip hot soup altogether, Dr. Wu says. Bonus: These tips can also double as relief for hot flashes.    <strong>More from <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/" target="_hplink">iVillage</a>:</strong>    <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/sleep-deprived-no-more-cleveland-clinic-sleep-expert-answers-your-top-10-qs-0/4-b-360330?par=aol" target="_hplink">Sleep Deprived No More! Cleveland Clinic Experts Answer Your Top 10 Qs</a>  <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/7-foods-lower-cholesterol/4-b-121656?par=aol" target="_hplink">7 Foods That Lower Cholesterol</a>  <a href="http://www.ivillage.com/best-ways-beat-depression-without-drugs/4-b-299809?par=aol]" target="_hplink">Best Ways to Treat Depression Without Drugs</a>
When you have rosacea -- a condition spurring redness, swelling and small pimples on your face -- it often causes your face to flush so you look like you're blushing. It can flare up more frequently and intensely in high temperatures. Dr. Wu's advice is to take any steps necessary to keep yourself cool. "I recommend carrying a spray mister of water," she says. "If you're in the car, spray your face and turn the air conditioner vent towards you." Heat and steam from hot drinks can also worsen flushing, so get that latte or tea over ice, and skip hot soup altogether, Dr. Wu says. Bonus: These tips can also double as relief for hot flashes. More from iVillage: Sleep Deprived No More! Cleveland Clinic Experts Answer Your Top 10 Qs 7 Foods That Lower Cholesterol Best Ways to Treat Depression Without Drugs

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