Tonga's undersea cable may take 'weeks' to repair after volcanic eruption

·2 min read
Tonga's undersea cable may take 'weeks' to repair after volcanic eruption

It may take weeks to repair an undersea fiber-optic cable connecting Tonga to the rest of the world, which was severed during Saturday's massive eruption of a submarine volcano near the South Pacific archipelago nation.

New Zealand's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said in a statement Wednesday that U.S.-based company SubCom, which builds underwater cable networks across the globe and is the repair contractor for more than 31,000 miles of cable in the South Pacific Ocean, "advises it will take at least four weeks for Tonga's cable connection to be repaired."

The ministry said Caribbean-based mobile network provider Digicel has set up an interim system on Tonga's main island, Tongatapu, using the University of South Pacific's satellite dish, which may allow a 2G connection to be established Wednesday, though it will be "limited and patchy."

Domestic and international communications for Tonga were cut off due to damage to the undersea cable. While limited communication within Tonga has been restored through satellite telephones and high-frequency radio, the internet is still down, the Tongan government said in a statement Tuesday.

PHOTO: A grab taken from the NOAA GOES-West satellite on Jan. 15, 2022 and obtained via NASA shows the eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano in Tonga that provoked a tsunami. (Handout/NASA/NOAA/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: A grab taken from the NOAA GOES-West satellite on Jan. 15, 2022 and obtained via NASA shows the eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano in Tonga that provoked a tsunami. (Handout/NASA/NOAA/AFP via Getty Images)

Satellite images captured the blast of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano on Saturday evening, with NASA's Earth Observatory calling it "one of the most potent volcanic eruptions in decades."

The explosion "obliterated" the small, uninhabited South Pacific island where the submarine volcano was located, about 40 miles north of Tonga's capital, Nuku'alofa, and "produced an atmospheric shock wave and tsunami that traveled around the world," the observatory said in a statement Saturday.

MORE: Tonga government releases 1st statement since volcanic blast, described huge mushroom plume

Nearly 50-foot tsunami waves crashed ashore on several of Tonga's 170 islands, devastating villages, while a huge mushroom-shaped cloud of volcanic ash, steam and gas covered the entire Polynesian kingdom, according to the Tongan government. A search-and-rescue mission was launched the following morning and at least three people have been confirmed dead -- a British national and two Tongan citizens. There were also a number of injuries reported, the Tongan government said.

New Zealand's foreign ministry confirmed Wednesday that no further deaths were reported in Tonga.

PHOTO: This photo provided by the New Zealand Defense Force shows volcanic ash covering roof tops and vegetation in an area of Tonga on Jan. 17, 2022, two days after a huge undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami. (Cpl. Vanessa Parker/New Zealand Defense Force via AP, File)
PHOTO: This photo provided by the New Zealand Defense Force shows volcanic ash covering roof tops and vegetation in an area of Tonga on Jan. 17, 2022, two days after a huge undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami. (Cpl. Vanessa Parker/New Zealand Defense Force via AP, File)

Sea and air transportation have been impacted due to continuing large waves in the waters surrounding Tonga as well as volcanic ash blanketing airport runways. Water supplies have also been "seriously affected," the Tongan government said.

MORE: Tsunami advisory issued for American Samoa after another volcano eruption in Tonga

Emergency response operations, including distribution of disaster relief supplies, initial assessments of the damages and clean-up of the airports, were still underway Tuesday, according to the Tongan government. New Zealand's foreign ministry said the work to clear airport runways in Tonga is expected to be completed Wednesday.

Australia and New Zealand have dispatched naval ships carrying relief supplies and clean drinking water to Tonga, their South Pacific neighbor. New Zealand's vessels are expected to arrive by Friday, depending on weather conditions, according to New Zealand's foreign ministry.

Tonga's undersea cable may take 'weeks' to repair after volcanic eruption originally appeared on abcnews.go.com

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