'Protect Black Women': Advocates back Megan Thee Stallion amid controversial Drake lyric

As Megan Thee Stallion uses her platform to speak out for Black women, the Grammy-winning rapper's own story has become part of the movement.

A controversial new Drake lyric that appears to question Megan Thee Stallion's account of getting shot in 2020 has sparked backlash and prompted outrage from advocates within the movement to "Protect Black Women."

"This b---- lie 'bout gettin shots, but she still a stallion / She don't even get the joke but she still smilin," Drake raps in his song "Circo Loco" with 21 Savage on his latest album, "Her Loss."

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While some fans have suggested on social media that the lyric could be referencing plastic surgery, others have accused Drake of questioning Megan's allegation that she was shot in the feet by rapper Tory Lanez on July 12, 2020, in the Hollywood Hills.

Lanez, whose real name is Daystar Petersen, was charged on Oct. 8, 2020, with one felony count of assault in the incident with Megan that involved a semiautomatic firearm, and another felony count for carrying a loaded, unregistered firearm in a vehicle.

Lanez has pleaded not guilty and is awaiting trial. His attorney did not respond to requests for comment.

PHOTO: Megan Thee Stallion attends the 64th Annual Grammy Awards in Las Vegas, April 3, 2022. (Johnny Nunez/Getty Images, FILE)
PHOTO: Megan Thee Stallion attends the 64th Annual Grammy Awards in Las Vegas, April 3, 2022. (Johnny Nunez/Getty Images, FILE)

In a series of tweets, Megan, whose legal name is Megan Pete, slammed the Drake lyric, writing "RAP N------ ARE LAME! Ready to boycott bout shoes and clothes but dog pile on a black woman when she say one of y'all homeboys abused her."

Drake has not responded publicly or to ABC News' request for comment.

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DJ Laura Stylez, who hosts a show on Hot 97 – New York's flagship hip-hop radio station – told "Nightline" that while some fans have stood by Megan, others have continued to question her story.

"There's the fans who completely feel that it was fabricated; they don't care about any of the facts. They call [Megan] a liar. And then there's people who are standing behind [this] woman who has been bullied," Stylez said.

"Black women are not celebrated enough for all [their] contributions … not just hip hop, everything," she added. "So it is a constant reminder that all of us as a whole have to do better."

PHOTO: Musical guest Megan Thee Stallion performs on Saturday Night Live, Oct. 3, 2020. (Getty Images, FILE)
PHOTO: Musical guest Megan Thee Stallion performs on Saturday Night Live, Oct. 3, 2020. (Getty Images, FILE)

The Southern Black Girls & Women's Consortium, which has partnered with Megan in the past, joined forces with advocates for Black women and influential leaders in writing an open letter of support for the hip-hop star.

"You don't deserve any of this, Megan. You deserve to be heard, to be believed, and, most importantly, to be safe," the letter read.

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Malikah Berry Rogers, executive director of the Southern Black Girls and Women's Consortium, told "Nightline" that Megan's story illustrates how Black women live at the "intersection between sexism and racism."

"There is something that is lingering in our culture that it is OK to objectify, to create places that are not safe for Black girls and women, and we are here to stand and say, absolutely not," she said.

According to a 2017 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Homicides occur in women of all ages and among all races/ethnicities, but young, racial/ethnic minority women are disproportionately affected."

Moreover, Violence Policy Center data shows that Black women in 2020 were killed by males at nearly three times the rate of white women.

PHOTO: Megan Thee Stallion attends the 64th Annual Grammy Awards in Las Vegas, April 3, 2022. (FilmMagic/Getty Images, FILE)
PHOTO: Megan Thee Stallion attends the 64th Annual Grammy Awards in Las Vegas, April 3, 2022. (FilmMagic/Getty Images, FILE)

Treva Lindsey, a professor of gender studies at Ohio State University who studies hip-hop and Black feminism, told "Nightline" that Megan Thee Stallion's story speaks to the disproportionate violence that Black women and girls face in America.

"There is this silence that still surrounds gender and sexual violence, particularly against marginalized women like Meg," Lindsey said.

According to Lindsey, when women face "a society that questions them," they are less likely to speak up when they experience violence.

"People often remain silent," she said.

"And in the case of Black women in particular, you don't feel that you'll be believed if you come forward."

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Over the past few years, violence against Black women has been spotlighted through the "Protect Black Women" movement, which highlights the two-front battle of sexism and racism Black women experience in their own communities and in society at large.

Megan, who has used her platform to spotlight the stories of Black women, has become one of the most visible voices in the movement.

"Even as a victim, I have been met with skepticism and judgment," Megan wrote in an op-ed for The New York Times published on Oct. 13, 2020. "...There's not much room for passionate advocacy if you are a Black woman."

ABC News' Anthony McMahon and Izzie Mendez contributed to this report.

'Protect Black Women': Advocates back Megan Thee Stallion amid controversial Drake lyric originally appeared on abcnews.go.com