Jan. 6 committee wants to hear from Ginni Thomas after email revelations

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Chairman Bennie Thompson told reporters Thursday that the Jan. 6 committee will "soon" invite Ginni Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and an avid Trump supporter, to speak with the panel.

"We think it's time that we would, at some point, invite her to come talk to the committee," Thompson said in the wake of revelations about emails that sources said she exchanged with right-wing lawyer John Eastman, a former clerk to Justice Thomas.

The committee has said Eastman was the mastermind behind the legal scheme to fraudulently overturn the election, in part by pressuring then-Vice President Mike Pence to reject some states' legitimate electoral votes on Jan. 6 when Congress met to certify the election results.

PHOTO: Ginni Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Oxon Hill, Md., Feb. 23, 2017. (Susan Walsh/AP, FILE)
PHOTO: Ginni Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Oxon Hill, Md., Feb. 23, 2017. (Susan Walsh/AP, FILE)

MORE: Jan. 6 hearing live updates: Committee to ask Ginni Thomas for interview

Thompson didn't give any details about public or private testimony and when the committee would make a formal invitation.

An aide to Jan. 6 committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney said she agrees it is time to formally ask Ginni Thomas to speak with the committee.

It is still unclear when the committee would ask Thomas to come and in what form they would request to speak with her.

ABC News has reached out to her lawyer for comment.

Thomas told the Daily Caller, "I can't wait to clear up misconceptions. I look forward to talking to them."

Eastman responded responding in a blog post, saying, "at no time did I discuss with Mrs. Thomas or Justice Thomas any matters pending or likely to come before the Court."

MORE: Jan. 6 committee to show texts with Trump aides, play depositions of family members

Sources confirmed to ABC News on Wednesday that the committee has come into possession of emails between Eastman and Ginni Thomas.

PHOTO: In this March 16, 2017, file photo, Chapman School of Law professor John Eastman testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Susan Walsh/AP, FILE)
PHOTO: In this March 16, 2017, file photo, Chapman School of Law professor John Eastman testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Susan Walsh/AP, FILE)

MORE: Photo shows Vice President Mike Pence, family in hiding on Jan. 6: ABC News Exclusive

The existence of the emails was first reported by the Washington Post.

It's unclear what the communications between Eastman and Ginni Thomas say, but Eastman has fought the committee's document requests in court.

MORE: John Eastman, Trump's former lawyer, asked Pennsylvania lawmakers to throw out absentee ballots to overturn Biden win

A federal judge has ruled twice that he must turn some of these documents over and the committee has just recently begun receiving the second tranche of them.

Investigators are discussing next steps and deciding how much of a focus they should put on Thomas and her communications with people like Eastman and former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows during its public hearings.

Jan. 6 committee wants to hear from Ginni Thomas after email revelations originally appeared on abcnews.go.com