Clinton Embarks on Bus Tour Courting Anti-Trump Republicans

Clinton Embarks on Bus Tour Courting Anti-Trump Republicans

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, fresh off her historic week in Philadelphia, kicked off the last 100 days of her campaign by embarking on a bus tour that will be part of a concerted effort by the Clinton campaign to court anti-Donald Trump Republican voters.

"As of tomorrow, we have 100 days to take our case to America. So what better place to kick off this campaign than right here in in Philadelphia where it all started 240 years ago," Clinton said to a crowd of more than 5,000 people, with her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, by her side.

The three-day tour will traverse through Republican-leaning counties in western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio, areas of the country that former GOP nominee Mitt Romney won in the 2012 election. Clinton's campaign sees an opportunity to tap into the discontent among some Republicans who feel uncomfortable voting for Trump.

In Philadelphia, Clinton and Kaine, who were joined by their spouses, painted Trump as an economic danger to the nation.

"We’re going to be visiting a few places where people are making things. I find it highly amusing that Donald Trump talks about 'Make America Great Again.' He doesn’t make a thing in America except bankruptcies," Clinton said.

Kaine warmed up the crowd for Clinton and attacked Trump at the same time.

"The Republican Convention was like a twisted and negative tour. It wasn't a tour of this country. It was a journey through Donald Trump's mind. And that is a very frightening place. That is a very frightening place," Kaine said.

Clinton will also make a rare appearance on Fox News this Sunday in an effort to reach disgruntled GOP voters.

In her address to the Democratic National Convention last night, Clinton presented herself as a candidate of inclusion, describing herself as someone who "will be a president for Democrats, Republicans and independents."

"Whatever party you belong to, or if you belong to no party at all, if you share these beliefs, this is your campaign," Clinton said.

Clinton's selection of Kaine as her running mate could boost her appeal with moderate Republicans. In his DNC address Wednesday night, Kaine told the story of his Republican father-in-law, a former Virginia governor, who is increasingly voting for Democrats.

"He’s voting for Democrats, because any party that would nominate Donald Trump for president has moved too far away from his party of Lincoln. And I tell ya, if any of you are looking for that party of Lincoln, we’ve got a home for you right here in the Democratic Party," Kaine said.

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