Wyc Grousbeck recalls hilarious Tommy Heinsohn-Red Auerbach story

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Wyc Grousbeck shares hilarious Tommy Heinsohn-Red Auerbach story originally appeared on NBC Sports Boston

Tommy Heinsohn spent more than half a century with the Boston Celtics -- and he had plenty of stories to tell.

Sunday is "Tommy Heinsohn Day" on NBC Sports Boston, as we remember the Celtics legend who passed away in November after Hall of Fame careers as a player, head coach and broadcaster.

Everyone involved with the Celtics has a favorite "Tommy story" to tell, and team majority owner Wyc Grousbeck is no exception.

NBC Sports Boston, Celtics remember a legend on "Tommy Heinsohn Day"

On Celtics Pregame Live, Grousbeck recalled one of his favorite stories Heinsohn would tell involving former team president Red Auerbach.

"My favorite story Tommy would tell would be about Red when they had him arrested in Russia," Grousbeck said, as seen in the video above.

"They had him thrown in prison and they waited until the next morning to bail him out. And Tommy is in hysterics and everybody is in hysterics and Red is just sitting there with his arms folded puffing his cigar just furious."

Things might have actually gone down a bit differently than Grousbeck remembers. In an interview with The Boston Globe's Adam Himmelsbach last July, Heinsohn recalled that the incident actually happened in Poland in 1964 -- and that Heinsohn himself was the victim of the prank.

Via Himmelsbach:

Then one day between games in Poland, Heinsohn was in his hotel room when he heard a knock on the door. When he opened it, two men with trench coats on their backs and serious looks on their faces were standing there. They flashed some kind of badge and said they were police, but Heinsohn was skeptical.

“One of them says to me, ‘Heinsohn, get passport. Come with us,’” Heinsohn recalled. “And I’m going holy [cow], what’s this about? They take me out of the hotel, and there’s an alley right to the left of the hotel. So they walked me to the alley and I’m looking. I’m walking down the alley thinking, ‘This son of a [gun] is going to shoot me.’”

That's a great story in its own right, and we're sure there are plenty more where that came from.

"The Tommy and Red stories -- those guys went back to 1957, OK? -- it's what Celtic pride is all about," Grousbeck said.