Troops Were Told to Up Salt Intake Ahead of Queen's Funeral, Two Military Members Still Passed Out

·3 min read
Troops Were Told to Up Salt Intake Ahead of Queen's Funeral, Two Military Members Still Passed Out

There is a method in place to ensure soldiers honoring Queen Elizabeth II at her state funeral don't faint.

Ahead of the service held Monday at Westminster Abbey in London, the troops were told to take one satchel of salt every day for the last week so they wouldn't pass out. To add electrolytes, they were also advised to put salt on their food.

Even with this approach, two military members still passed out while making their way to Windsor Castle following the first procession.

RELATED: A Guide to All the Notable Names at Queen Elizabeth II's Funeral

Nearly 6,000 U.K. Armed Forces personnel were tapped to partake in the funeral service. Rehearsals were held at the Army Training Centre in Pirbright, according to the Daily Mail.

General Sir Patrick Sanders, Head of the Army and Chief of the General Staff, initially teased that Monday's state funeral "will be like nothing any of us have seen in our lifetimes."

Queen Elizabeth II Funeral - Coffin
Queen Elizabeth II Funeral - Coffin

BBC America

"It's obviously a first and will bring together all the elements of the Armed Forces, all those who serve in a procession that I hope will be precise and will be immaculate," Sanders said on BBC Radio 4, per Metro U.K. "But it's taking us a lot of practice to get it right as you'd expect."

The Queen, who was Britain's longest-reigning monarch, died on Sept. 8 at her beloved Scottish residence, Balmoral Castle, at age 96. She will be succeeded by son King Charles III, whose coronation is expected to commence sometime next year.

At Monday's procession, members of the British royal family marched behind the Queen's coffin, which was carried on the State Gun Carriage of the Royal Navy. The King, 73, was joined by sons Prince William and Prince Harry, as well as his siblings, as he walked behind the coffin for nearly 1.5 hours.

queen-elizabeth-funeral coffin
queen-elizabeth-funeral coffin

BBC Queen Elizabeth's funeral

The State Gun Carriage carries the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and sceptre, in the Ceremonial Procession during her State Funeral at Westminster Abbey, London. Picture date: Monday September 19, 2022. (Photo by Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images)
The State Gun Carriage carries the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and sceptre, in the Ceremonial Procession during her State Funeral at Westminster Abbey, London. Picture date: Monday September 19, 2022. (Photo by Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images)

Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Queen Elizabeth's funeral

Soldiers from the Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, were specially selected to carry the coffin to Westminster Abbey and later to St George's Chapel in Windsor. Once the monarch is officially laid to rest, the Queen's Company will change its name to reflect the new King.

"They became the Queen's Company immediately after the death of George VI and the queen has been commander ever since," former British Army soldier Major Adrian Weale told the PA news agency, according to The Independent. "It's their role to protect her body, both in life and in death, remaining the Queen's Company until King Charles decides otherwise. Their duties will then be transitioned to the next monarch."

Queen Elizabeth II wearing the in the Throne room at Buckingham Palace, after her Coronation in Westminster Abbey. (Photo by PA Images
Queen Elizabeth II wearing the in the Throne room at Buckingham Palace, after her Coronation in Westminster Abbey. (Photo by PA Images

PA Images via Getty Queen Elizabeth II in the Throne room at Buckingham Palace after her Coronation in Westminster Abbey

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The Queen will be buried inside St George's Chapel, where several other British royals, including King George VI, have been laid to rest before her.