Tori Spelling Recalls Gut-Wrenching Cyberbullying She Endured While on Beverly Hills, 90210

Mona Thomas
·2 min read

Tori Spelling is opening up about the cyberbullying she's experienced for over 30 years.

The actress, who rose to fame as Donna Martin on Beverly Hills, 90210, took to Instagram to discuss how her career has affected her relationship with her body image, specifically her eyes.

"My Dad always said ‘Your eyes are the windows to your soul'...I've never forgotten that," Tori, the daughter of the late producer Aaron Spelling, began. "Because of that belief my Dad rarely let his actors wear sunglasses in a scene. He believed their eyes conveyed everything. All emotions. I've carried that motto thru my life. I always look people in the eyes. I hold their gaze always. I never look away. I've taught my kids to always show people respect and look them in the eyes when they are talking to them."

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The mother of five also wrote about being heavily scrutinized as a teen celebrity.

"I used to hate my eyes. When I started 90210 at 16 I was filled with low self confidence. Then, internet trolls ( yep we had them back then too!)called me frog and bug eyed," the Scream 2 star revealed. "Being put under a microscope as a young girl in her formative years was hard. I spent years begging makeup artists on my shows and movies to please try to make my eyes look smaller. I would cry over my looks in the makeup trailer chair."

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She went into detail explaining how choices about her looks were made "by nameless and faceless accounts." Many of the comments are the reasons why the 47-year-old doesn't look "straight on in photos and videos" to this day.

"Years of hurtful comments that I don't even want to share to give them energy," she expressed. "Way worse than bug or frog eyes. Just remember next time that you go to comment on someone's account regarding their face or body or choices, you don't know them."

Tori continued, "They don't know you. But, their soul will remember that unkind comment. It'll be imprinted on them. Our memories can't remember physical pain but we do remember emotional, verbal, and written pain."

She concluded the in-depth caption with, "That said. Here's me. Straight on. I love my eyes now. They make me uniquely me. And, I rarely wear sunglasses."