Sum 41 announce split after final album and tour

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Canadian rock band Sum 41 is disbanding after 27 years together.

The pop-punk group comprised of Deryck Whibley, Dave Baksh, Jason McCaslin, Tom Thacker, and Frank Zummo announced the split on social media Monday, sharing that their forthcoming eighth studio album, Heaven & Hell, will be the band's last.

"Being in Sum 41 since 1996 brought us some of the best moments of our lives," the statement began. "We are forever grateful to our fans both old and new, who have supported us in every way. It is hard to articulate the love and respect we have for all of you and we wanted you to hear this from us first."

"We will still be finishing all of our current tour dates this year, and we're looking forward to releasing our final album 'Heaven :x: Hell,' along with a final worldwide headlining tour to celebrate," the band continued. "Details will be announced as soon as we have them. For now, we look forward to seeing all of you skumfuks on the road and are excited for what the future will bring for each of us."

Deryck Whibley, Jason McCaslin, Tom Thacker, Dave Baksh, Frank Zummo from Sum 41 are posing for Photo Session at Rock en Seine on August 28, 2016 in Paris, France
Deryck Whibley, Jason McCaslin, Tom Thacker, Dave Baksh, Frank Zummo from Sum 41 are posing for Photo Session at Rock en Seine on August 28, 2016 in Paris, France

David Wolff - Patrick/Redferns Sum 41

The band formed in 1999 and released their first full-length album, All Killer No Filler, in 2001, which features hits "Fat Lip" and "In Too Deep." It was certified platinum in the U.S., U.K., and Canada. Amid numerous lineup changes, Sum 41 released several EPs and seven more albums, including Chuck (2004), Underclass Hero (2007), Screaming Bloody Murder (2011), and Order in Decline (2019).

Heaven & Hell, which was developed during the COVID-19 lockdowns, will see the band return to the pop-punk roots of their early days, Whibley told Rolling Stone last year. "A lot of other people were retreating to things that made them feel good in the past," he said. "There's some weird nostalgia that kicked in because of the pandemic. It all made sense to me why pop-punk is coming back: it's feel-good music. There's something that's happy about it. Something young and innocent and free."

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