Steve Jobs' Daughter Eve Jobs Models Alongside Euphoria's Sydney Sweeney for Glossier Campaign

Kaitlyn Frey
·2 min read

Steve Jobs' youngest daughter Eve Jobs is making her debut as a model.

Despite keeping a relatively low public profile for most of her upbringing, Eve, 22, seems to be ready to make a splash in the modeling industry as she joins Euphoria star Sydney Sweeney and RuPaul's Drag Race runner-up Naomi Smalls for Glossier's holiday ad campaign.

Eve dared to strip down for her ad spot, posing while sitting in a bubble bath and sipping on a glass of wine, while sporting a minimal holiday makeup look.

In another photo, she wore under-eye masks and applied the high-shine Glossier Lip Gloss in Red to her pout. She wrote on Instagram, "Biggest thanks to @emilyweiss & everyone at @glossier! Go check out the collection."

Like Eve, the Euphoria actress embraced a natural makeup look in the campaign photos she snapped for Glossier. Sweeney, 23, kept her hair in its easygoing textured waves and showed the shimmering gold shade of the Glossier Lip Gloss she wore in the selfie.

Also joining the campaign, Naomi Smalls, a RuPaul's Drag Race season eight runner up, who also models the gold shade of the Glossier Lip Gloss in a glowing selfie.

As for the newest face on the industry scene, CNBC reported that Eve, one of the late Apple co-founder's four children, attended Stanford University, which just happens to be the same school where her father and mother Laurene Powell-Jobs met.

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She's also one of the most accomplished young equestrians under age 25 in the world. According to Horse Sport, Eve was ranked number five on the list of top 1,000 riders under 25 around the world in 2019, and her Instagram page shows the passion she has for the sport.

"Being a sensitive person, I internalize a lot and get upset with myself when I feel like I’ve messed up, either in life or with riding," she told Horse Sport last year. "Learning that people screw up, that it’s actually inevitable, and that it’s okay. And the second being that you can learn something from everyone. Absolutely everyone."