Six Flags Is Making Its Parks More Accessible for Visitors with Special Needs

·2 min read
Six Flags Theme Park
Six Flags Theme Park

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Six Flags has announced its expanding accessibility for park-goers with special needs.

On Thursday, the theme park company shared some new initiatives that are intended to make the amusement parks more inclusive. One of the new safety programs includes a special "restraint harness" for all Six Flags thrill rides for guests with some physical disabilities, per a release.

Six Flags, which has over 20 theme parks around the U.S., Canada and Mexico, notes that 98% of rides have an "individually designed harness." The new innovation has multiple sizes to accommodate park-goers with "physical disabilities such as a missing limb or appendages starting at 54" tall."

"Six Flags is proud to be the industry leader on these innovative programs that allows our guests to enjoy the more thrilling rides that our parks have to offer," Selim Bassoul, Six Flags President and CEO, said in a statement.

Along with the new harness, the amusement park company announced that all properties are now accredited as Certified Autism Centers in partnership with the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). Park leadership will be trained in helping provide various support elements for guests with autism.

Included in this initiative are special guides to help visitors plan the day, highlighting sensory impacts of each attraction and ride.

Six Flags joins other major theme parks that are already Certified Autism Centers, including SeaWorld Orlando, Sesame Place San Diego and Legoland Florida Resort.

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Six Flags Theme Park
Six Flags Theme Park

Justin Sullivan/Getty

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"This offering, coupled with the IBCCES certification at our parks, shows our unwavering commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion. Our company is truly dedicated to this initiative and making sure that encompasses our guests with abilities and disabilities," Bassoul added.

Some more features that the parks will offer as Certified Autism Centers are "low sensory areas" to allow visitors who have sensory sensitivities to take a break in a calm environment. Trained team members will also be on hand to assist park-goers, according to the release.

"Six Flags is synonymous with thrills, but safety and inclusivity is the cornerstone of everything we do," Jason Freeman, Vice President, Public Safety and Risk Management, said in a statement.

The new safety programs "bring thrills within reach for all guests," regardless of any disability, he added.