‘Scrubs’ Team Would Love to Reunite on Screen

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At the end of a Scrubs reunion panel Sunday at the ATX TV Festival, an audience member asked the cast what they thought their characters would be doing now.

“You’re asking me to write the reboot in front of you!” series creator Bill Lawrence interjected.

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The show’s core cast — Zach Braff, Donald Faison, Sarah Chalke, John C. McGinley, Judy Reyes and Neil Flynn — and Lawrence shared some of their favorite times on set of the NBC/ABC comedy, which ran from 2001-10. The actors and creator have stayed close in the decade-plus since the series ended — Braff and Faison even host a retrospective podcast called Fake Doctors, Real Friends — so conversation inevitably turned to an on-screen reunion or sequel.

“We’re gonna do it, you guys know,” Lawrence said — though it should be noted that there’s no formal arrangement of any kind. The Ted Lasso co-creator added that “If you ever have an excuse to work with people you want to spend time with anyway, run to it.”

Still, with everyone on stage having very active careers, it’s unlikely a 10th season of Scrubs would be in the offing anytime soon. “We all want to work together again, but it wouldn’t be a full season,” Faison said. “Maybe a movie, something we could do in two months.”

The Sacred Heart team also discussed how Scrubs was an early adopter — particularly on the broadcast networks at the time — at mixing drama with comedy, something that began with the show’s fourth episode, “My Old Lady.” In the episode, three patients treated by young doctors John Dorian (Braff), Elliot Reid (Chalke) and Chris Turk (Faison) all die. Lawrence recalled pitching the story to NBC and pushback from the network about whether all three patients had to die.

“I said — and this was not me [forecasting what would become one of the show’s signature elements] but just being a smartass — ‘If we turn down the lights and play an indie song, it might work,'” Lawrence said.

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