Sarah Jessica Parker Asks Fans to Stop Calling Her Gray Hair 'Brave'

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Sarah Jessica Parker seen on the set of "And Just Like That..." the follow up series to "Sex and the City"
Sarah Jessica Parker seen on the set of "And Just Like That..." the follow up series to "Sex and the City"

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Sarah Jessica Parker is getting honest about aging.

In an interview this Thursday with Allure, the And Just Like That... star, 57, opened up about what aging means to her and reacted to the photo of her sporting gray roots that went viral last year.

"It became months and months of conversation about how brave I am for having gray hair," she told the magazine. "I was like, please please applaud someone else's courage on something!"

For Parker, owning her gray hair is mostly a matter of time and patience, not bravery. "I can't spend time getting base color every two weeks," she told the outlet. "Can't do it. Nope. Too much"

A similar situation happened to the actress after one particular episode of And Just Like That..., in which Parker's character Carrie Bradshaw accompanied Anthony (Mario Cantone) to a plastic surgeon consultation and ended up accepting the doctor's offer to see what surgical results would look like on her. The fictional doctor promised, "With the right work and the right touch, the last 15 years are gone."

"'Very brave, Sarah Jessica. You were so brave,'" Parker said to Allure on the feedback she got after the episode aired.

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Much like Carrie, Parker isn't too enticed by the offer. "What's the point?" she asked, "I just… don't care enough." For her, as long as she feels good "according to her standards" that's what matters the most. "I'm not without vanity, I guess I just don't care enough about everybody else's opinion," she concluded.

Instead, Parker invites the world to see wrinkles as a natural thing, that together bring a laundry list of positives. "We spend so much time talking about the accumulation of time spent adding up in wrinkles, and it's the weirdest thing that we don't say it adds up to being better at your job, better as a friend, better as a daughter, better as a partner, better as a caregiver, better as a sister," Parker told the outlet.

RELATED: Charlotte Hair Shames Miranda for Going Gray in And Just Like That… — and Her Clap Back Is Major

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 18: Sarah Jessica Parker and Andy Cohen are seen at Anton's on July 18, 2021
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 18: Sarah Jessica Parker and Andy Cohen are seen at Anton's on July 18, 2021

Gotham/GC Images

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This isn't the first time the actress has opened up about the world's reaction to her aging. In December 2021, she spoke to Vogue about the double standards she was witnessed in the public's reaction to the viral photo.

"There's so much misogynist chatter in response to us that would never. Happen. About. A. Man," Parker said in the interview. " 'Gray hair gray hair gray hair. Does she have gray hair?' I'm sitting with Andy Cohen, and he has a full head of gray hair, and he's exquisite," she continued of her pal and 2021 Met Gala date. "Why is it okay for him?"

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The six-time Golden Globe winner pointed out that "especially on social media," people can be judgmental.

"'She has too many wrinkles, she doesn't have enough wrinkles.' It almost feels as if people don't want us to be perfectly okay with where we are, as if they almost enjoy us being pained by who we are today, whether we choose to age naturally and not look perfect, or whether you do something if that makes you feel better," Parker said of the noise. "I know what I look like. I have no choice. What am I going to do about it? Stop aging? Disappear?"